Ez az oldal sütiket használ

A portál felületén sütiket (cookies) használ, vagyis a rendszer adatokat tárol az Ön böngészőjében. A sütik személyek azonosítására nem alkalmasak, szolgáltatásaink biztosításához szükségesek. Az oldal használatával Ön beleegyezik a sütik használatába.

Hírek

Shakespeare, William: Hamlet (Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (Detail) Francia nyelven)

Shakespeare, William portréja

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (Detail) (Angol)


ACT III.

SCENE I.

A room in the castle.

Enter KING CLAUDIUS, QUEEN GERTRUDE, POLONIUS, OPHELIA, ROSENCRANTZ, and GUILDENSTERN



KING CLAUDIUS

And can you, by no drift of circumstance,
Get from him why he puts on this confusion,
Grating so harshly all his days of quiet
With turbulent and dangerous lunacy?

ROSENCRANTZ

He does confess he feels himself distracted;
But from what cause he will by no means speak.

GUILDENSTERN

Nor do we find him forward to be sounded,
But, with a crafty madness, keeps aloof,
When we would bring him on to some confession
Of his true state.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Did he receive you well?

ROSENCRANTZ

Most like a gentleman.

GUILDENSTERN

But with much forcing of his disposition.

ROSENCRANTZ

Niggard of question; but, of our demands,
Most free in his reply.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Did you assay him?
To any pastime?

ROSENCRANTZ

Madam, it so fell out, that certain players
We o'er-raught on the way: of these we told him;
And there did seem in him a kind of joy
To hear of it: they are about the court,
And, as I think, they have already order
This night to play before him.

LORD POLONIUS

'Tis most true:
And he beseech'd me to entreat your majesties
To hear and see the matter.

KING CLAUDIUS

With all my heart; and it doth much content me
To hear him so inclined.
Good gentlemen, give him a further edge,
And drive his purpose on to these delights.

ROSENCRANTZ

We shall, my lord.

Exeunt ROSENCRANTZ and GUILDENSTERN

KING CLAUDIUS

Sweet Gertrude, leave us too;
For we have closely sent for Hamlet hither,
That he, as 'twere by accident, may here
Affront Ophelia:
Her father and myself, lawful espials,
Will so bestow ourselves that, seeing, unseen,
We may of their encounter frankly judge,
And gather by him, as he is behaved,
If 't be the affliction of his love or no
That thus he suffers for.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

I shall obey you.
And for your part, Ophelia, I do wish
That your good beauties be the happy cause
Of Hamlet's wildness: so shall I hope your virtues
Will bring him to his wonted way again,
To both your honours.

OPHELIA

Madam, I wish it may.

Exit QUEEN GERTRUDE

LORD POLONIUS

Ophelia, walk you here. Gracious, so please you,
We will bestow ourselves.

To OPHELIA

Read on this book;
That show of such an exercise may colour
Your loneliness. We are oft to blame in this,--
'Tis too much proved--that with devotion's visage
And pious action we do sugar o'er
The devil himself.

KING CLAUDIUS

[Aside] O, 'tis too true!
How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience!
The harlot's cheek, beautied with plastering art,
Is not more ugly to the thing that helps it
Than is my deed to my most painted word:
O heavy burthen!

LORD POLONIUS

I hear him coming: let's withdraw, my lord.

Exeunt KING CLAUDIUS and POLONIUS

Enter HAMLET

HAMLET

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action.--Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember'd.

OPHELIA

Good my lord,
How does your honour for this many a day?

HAMLET

I humbly thank you; well, well, well.

OPHELIA

My lord, I have remembrances of yours,
That I have longed long to re-deliver;
I pray you, now receive them.

HAMLET

No, not I;
I never gave you aught.

OPHELIA

My honour'd lord, you know right well you did;
And, with them, words of so sweet breath composed
As made the things more rich: their perfume lost,
Take these again; for to the noble mind
Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.
There, my lord.

HAMLET

Ha, ha! are you honest?

OPHELIA

My lord?

HAMLET

Are you fair?

OPHELIA

What means your lordship?

HAMLET

That if you be honest and fair, your honesty should
admit no discourse to your beauty.

OPHELIA

Could beauty, my lord, have better commerce than
with honesty?

HAMLET

Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner
transform honesty from what it is to a bawd than the
force of honesty can translate beauty into his
likeness: this was sometime a paradox, but now the
time gives it proof. I did love you once.

OPHELIA

Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.

HAMLET

You should not have believed me; for virtue cannot
so inoculate our old stock but we shall relish of
it: I loved you not.

OPHELIA

I was the more deceived.

HAMLET

Get thee to a nunnery: why wouldst thou be a
breeder of sinners? I am myself indifferent honest;
but yet I could accuse me of such things that it
were better my mother had not borne me: I am very
proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offences at
my beck than I have thoughts to put them in,
imagination to give them shape, or time to act them
in. What should such fellows as I do crawling
between earth and heaven? We are arrant knaves,
all; believe none of us. Go thy ways to a nunnery.
Where's your father?

OPHELIA

At home, my lord.

HAMLET

Let the doors be shut upon him, that he may play the
fool no where but in's own house. Farewell.

OPHELIA

O, help him, you sweet heavens!

HAMLET

If thou dost marry, I'll give thee this plague for
thy dowry: be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as
snow, thou shalt not escape calumny. Get thee to a
nunnery, go: farewell. Or, if thou wilt needs
marry, marry a fool; for wise men know well enough
what monsters you make of them. To a nunnery, go,
and quickly too. Farewell.

OPHELIA

O heavenly powers, restore him!

HAMLET

I have heard of your paintings too, well enough; God
has given you one face, and you make yourselves
another: you jig, you amble, and you lisp, and
nick-name God's creatures, and make your wantonness
your ignorance. Go to, I'll no more on't; it hath
made me mad. I say, we will have no more marriages:
those that are married already, all but one, shall
live; the rest shall keep as they are. To a
nunnery, go.

Exit

OPHELIA

O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!
The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword;
The expectancy and rose of the fair state,
The glass of fashion and the mould of form,
The observed of all observers, quite, quite down!
And I, of ladies most deject and wretched,
That suck'd the honey of his music vows,
Now see that noble and most sovereign reason,
Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh;
That unmatch'd form and feature of blown youth
Blasted with ecstasy: O, woe is me,
To have seen what I have seen, see what I see!

Re-enter KING CLAUDIUS and POLONIUS

KING CLAUDIUS

Love! his affections do not that way tend;
Nor what he spake, though it lack'd form a little,
Was not like madness. There's something in his soul,
O'er which his melancholy sits on brood;
And I do doubt the hatch and the disclose
Will be some danger: which for to prevent,
I have in quick determination
Thus set it down: he shall with speed to England,
For the demand of our neglected tribute
Haply the seas and countries different
With variable objects shall expel
This something-settled matter in his heart,
Whereon his brains still beating puts him thus
From fashion of himself. What think you on't?

LORD POLONIUS

It shall do well: but yet do I believe
The origin and commencement of his grief
Sprung from neglected love. How now, Ophelia!
You need not tell us what Lord Hamlet said;
We heard it all. My lord, do as you please;
But, if you hold it fit, after the play
Let his queen mother all alone entreat him
To show his grief: let her be round with him;
And I'll be placed, so please you, in the ear
Of all their conference. If she find him not,
To England send him, or confine him where
Your wisdom best shall think.

KING CLAUDIUS

It shall be so:
Madness in great ones must not unwatch'd go.

Exeunt





ACT III. SCENE II. A hall in the castle.

Enter HAMLET and Players

HAMLET

Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to
you, trippingly on the tongue: but if you mouth it,
as many of your players do, I had as lief the
town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air
too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently;
for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say,
the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget
a temperance that may give it smoothness. O, it
offends me to the soul to hear a robustious
periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to
very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who
for the most part are capable of nothing but
inexplicable dumbshows and noise: I would have such
a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it
out-herods Herod: pray you, avoid it.

First Player

I warrant your honour.

HAMLET

Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion
be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the
word to the action; with this special o'erstep not
the modesty of nature: for any thing so overdone is
from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the
first and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the
mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature,
scorn her own image, and the very age and body of
the time his form and pressure. Now this overdone,
or come tardy off, though it make the unskilful
laugh, cannot but make the judicious grieve; the
censure of the which one must in your allowance
o'erweigh a whole theatre of others. O, there be
players that I have seen play, and heard others
praise, and that highly, not to speak it profanely,
that, neither having the accent of Christians nor
the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so
strutted and bellowed that I have thought some of
nature's journeymen had made men and not made them
well, they imitated humanity so abominably.

First Player

I hope we have reformed that indifferently with us,
sir.

HAMLET

O, reform it altogether. And let those that play
your clowns speak no more than is set down for them;
for there be of them that will themselves laugh, to
set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh
too; though, in the mean time, some necessary
question of the play be then to be considered:
that's villanous, and shows a most pitiful ambition
in the fool that uses it. Go, make you ready.

Exeunt Players

Enter POLONIUS, ROSENCRANTZ, and GUILDENSTERN

How now, my lord! I will the king hear this piece of work?

LORD POLONIUS

And the queen too, and that presently.

HAMLET

Bid the players make haste.

Exit POLONIUS

Will you two help to hasten them?

ROSENCRANTZ GUILDENSTERN

We will, my lord.

Exeunt ROSENCRANTZ and GUILDENSTERN

HAMLET

What ho! Horatio!

Enter HORATIO

HORATIO

Here, sweet lord, at your service.

HAMLET

Horatio, thou art e'en as just a man
As e'er my conversation coped withal.

HORATIO

O, my dear lord,--

HAMLET

Nay, do not think I flatter;
For what advancement may I hope from thee
That no revenue hast but thy good spirits,
To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd?
No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp,
And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee
Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear?
Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice
And could of men distinguish, her election
Hath seal'd thee for herself; for thou hast been
As one, in suffering all, that suffers nothing,
A man that fortune's buffets and rewards
Hast ta'en with equal thanks: and blest are those
Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled,
That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger
To sound what stop she please. Give me that man
That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
As I do thee.--Something too much of this.--
There is a play to-night before the king;
One scene of it comes near the circumstance
Which I have told thee of my father's death:
I prithee, when thou seest that act afoot,
Even with the very comment of thy soul
Observe mine uncle: if his occulted guilt
Do not itself unkennel in one speech,
It is a damned ghost that we have seen,
And my imaginations are as foul
As Vulcan's stithy. Give him heedful note;
For I mine eyes will rivet to his face,
And after we will both our judgments join
In censure of his seeming.

HORATIO

Well, my lord:
If he steal aught the whilst this play is playing,
And 'scape detecting, I will pay the theft.

HAMLET

They are coming to the play; I must be idle:
Get you a place.

Danish march. A flourish. Enter KING CLAUDIUS, QUEEN GERTRUDE, POLONIUS, OPHELIA, ROSENCRANTZ, GUILDENSTERN, and others

KING CLAUDIUS

How fares our cousin Hamlet?

HAMLET

Excellent, i' faith; of the chameleon's dish: I eat
the air, promise-crammed: you cannot feed capons so.

KING CLAUDIUS

I have nothing with this answer, Hamlet; these words
are not mine.

HAMLET

No, nor mine now.

To POLONIUS

My lord, you played once i' the university, you say?

LORD POLONIUS

That did I, my lord; and was accounted a good actor.

HAMLET

What did you enact?

LORD POLONIUS

I did enact Julius Caesar: I was killed i' the
Capitol; Brutus killed me.

HAMLET

It was a brute part of him to kill so capital a calf
there. Be the players ready?

ROSENCRANTZ

Ay, my lord; they stay upon your patience.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Come hither, my dear Hamlet, sit by me.

HAMLET

No, good mother, here's metal more attractive.

LORD POLONIUS

[To KING CLAUDIUS] O, ho! do you mark that?

HAMLET

Lady, shall I lie in your lap?

Lying down at OPHELIA's feet

OPHELIA

No, my lord.

HAMLET

I mean, my head upon your lap?

OPHELIA

Ay, my lord.

HAMLET

Do you think I meant country matters?

OPHELIA

I think nothing, my lord.

HAMLET

That's a fair thought to lie between maids' legs.

OPHELIA

What is, my lord?

HAMLET

Nothing.

OPHELIA

You are merry, my lord.

HAMLET

Who, I?

OPHELIA

Ay, my lord.

HAMLET

O God, your only jig-maker. What should a man do
but be merry? for, look you, how cheerfully my
mother looks, and my father died within these two hours.

OPHELIA

Nay, 'tis twice two months, my lord.

HAMLET

So long? Nay then, let the devil wear black, for
I'll have a suit of sables. O heavens! die two
months ago, and not forgotten yet? Then there's
hope a great man's memory may outlive his life half
a year: but, by'r lady, he must build churches,
then; or else shall he suffer not thinking on, with
the hobby-horse, whose epitaph is 'For, O, for, O,
the hobby-horse is forgot.'

Hautboys play. The dumb-show enters

Enter a King and a Queen very lovingly; the Queen embracing him, and he her. She kneels, and makes show of protestation unto him. He takes her up, and declines his head upon her neck: lays him down upon a bank of flowers: she, seeing him asleep, leaves him. Anon comes in a fellow, takes off his crown, kisses it, and pours poison in the King's ears, and exit. The Queen returns; finds the King dead, and makes passionate action. The Poisoner, with some two or three Mutes, comes in again, seeming to lament with her. The dead body is carried away. The Poisoner wooes the Queen with gifts: she seems loath and unwilling awhile, but in the end accepts his love

Exeunt

OPHELIA

What means this, my lord?

HAMLET

Marry, this is miching mallecho; it means mischief.

OPHELIA

Belike this show imports the argument of the play.

Enter Prologue

HAMLET

We shall know by this fellow: the players cannot
keep counsel; they'll tell all.

OPHELIA

Will he tell us what this show meant?

HAMLET

Ay, or any show that you'll show him: be not you
ashamed to show, he'll not shame to tell you what it means.

OPHELIA

You are naught, you are naught: I'll mark the play.

Prologue

For us, and for our tragedy,
Here stooping to your clemency,
We beg your hearing patiently.

Exit

HAMLET

Is this a prologue, or the posy of a ring?

OPHELIA

'Tis brief, my lord.

HAMLET

As woman's love.

Enter two Players, King and Queen

Player King

Full thirty times hath Phoebus' cart gone round
Neptune's salt wash and Tellus' orbed ground,
And thirty dozen moons with borrow'd sheen
About the world have times twelve thirties been,
Since love our hearts and Hymen did our hands
Unite commutual in most sacred bands.

Player Queen

So many journeys may the sun and moon
Make us again count o'er ere love be done!
But, woe is me, you are so sick of late,
So far from cheer and from your former state,
That I distrust you. Yet, though I distrust,
Discomfort you, my lord, it nothing must:
For women's fear and love holds quantity;
In neither aught, or in extremity.
Now, what my love is, proof hath made you know;
And as my love is sized, my fear is so:
Where love is great, the littlest doubts are fear;
Where little fears grow great, great love grows there.

Player King

'Faith, I must leave thee, love, and shortly too;
My operant powers their functions leave to do:
And thou shalt live in this fair world behind,
Honour'd, beloved; and haply one as kind
For husband shalt thou--

Player Queen

O, confound the rest!
Such love must needs be treason in my breast:
In second husband let me be accurst!
None wed the second but who kill'd the first.

HAMLET

[Aside] Wormwood, wormwood.

Player Queen

The instances that second marriage move
Are base respects of thrift, but none of love:
A second time I kill my husband dead,
When second husband kisses me in bed.

Player King

I do believe you think what now you speak;
But what we do determine oft we break.
Purpose is but the slave to memory,
Of violent birth, but poor validity;
Which now, like fruit unripe, sticks on the tree;
But fall, unshaken, when they mellow be.
Most necessary 'tis that we forget
To pay ourselves what to ourselves is debt:
What to ourselves in passion we propose,
The passion ending, doth the purpose lose.
The violence of either grief or joy
Their own enactures with themselves destroy:
Where joy most revels, grief doth most lament;
Grief joys, joy grieves, on slender accident.
This world is not for aye, nor 'tis not strange
That even our loves should with our fortunes change;
For 'tis a question left us yet to prove,
Whether love lead fortune, or else fortune love.
The great man down, you mark his favourite flies;
The poor advanced makes friends of enemies.
And hitherto doth love on fortune tend;
For who not needs shall never lack a friend,
And who in want a hollow friend doth try,
Directly seasons him his enemy.
But, orderly to end where I begun,
Our wills and fates do so contrary run
That our devices still are overthrown;
Our thoughts are ours, their ends none of our own:
So think thou wilt no second husband wed;
But die thy thoughts when thy first lord is dead.

Player Queen

Nor earth to me give food, nor heaven light!
Sport and repose lock from me day and night!
To desperation turn my trust and hope!
An anchor's cheer in prison be my scope!
Each opposite that blanks the face of joy
Meet what I would have well and it destroy!
Both here and hence pursue me lasting strife,
If, once a widow, ever I be wife!

HAMLET

If she should break it now!

Player King

'Tis deeply sworn. Sweet, leave me here awhile;
My spirits grow dull, and fain I would beguile
The tedious day with sleep.

Sleeps

Player Queen

Sleep rock thy brain,
And never come mischance between us twain!

Exit

HAMLET

Madam, how like you this play?

QUEEN GERTRUDE

The lady protests too much, methinks.

HAMLET

O, but she'll keep her word.

KING CLAUDIUS

Have you heard the argument? Is there no offence in 't?

HAMLET

No, no, they do but jest, poison in jest; no offence
i' the world.

KING CLAUDIUS

What do you call the play?

HAMLET

The Mouse-trap. Marry, how? Tropically. This play
is the image of a murder done in Vienna: Gonzago is
the duke's name; his wife, Baptista: you shall see
anon; 'tis a knavish piece of work: but what o'
that? your majesty and we that have free souls, it
touches us not: let the galled jade wince, our
withers are unwrung.

Enter LUCIANUS

This is one Lucianus, nephew to the king.

OPHELIA

You are as good as a chorus, my lord.

HAMLET

I could interpret between you and your love, if I
could see the puppets dallying.

OPHELIA

You are keen, my lord, you are keen.

HAMLET

It would cost you a groaning to take off my edge.

OPHELIA

Still better, and worse.

HAMLET

So you must take your husbands. Begin, murderer;
pox, leave thy damnable faces, and begin. Come:
'the croaking raven doth bellow for revenge.'

LUCIANUS

Thoughts black, hands apt, drugs fit, and time agreeing;
Confederate season, else no creature seeing;
Thou mixture rank, of midnight weeds collected,
With Hecate's ban thrice blasted, thrice infected,
Thy natural magic and dire property,
On wholesome life usurp immediately.

Pours the poison into the sleeper's ears

HAMLET

He poisons him i' the garden for's estate. His
name's Gonzago: the story is extant, and writ in
choice Italian: you shall see anon how the murderer
gets the love of Gonzago's wife.

OPHELIA

The king rises.

HAMLET

What, frighted with false fire!

QUEEN GERTRUDE

How fares my lord?

LORD POLONIUS

Give o'er the play.

KING CLAUDIUS

Give me some light: away!

All

Lights, lights, lights!

Exeunt all but HAMLET and HORATIO

HAMLET

Why, let the stricken deer go weep,
The hart ungalled play;
For some must watch, while some must sleep:
So runs the world away.
Would not this, sir, and a forest of feathers-- if
the rest of my fortunes turn Turk with me--with two
Provincial roses on my razed shoes, get me a
fellowship in a cry of players, sir?

HORATIO

Half a share.

HAMLET

A whole one, I.
For thou dost know, O Damon dear,
This realm dismantled was
Of Jove himself; and now reigns here
A very, very--pajock.

HORATIO

You might have rhymed.

HAMLET

O good Horatio, I'll take the ghost's word for a
thousand pound. Didst perceive?

HORATIO

Very well, my lord.

HAMLET

Upon the talk of the poisoning?

HORATIO

I did very well note him.

HAMLET

Ah, ha! Come, some music! come, the recorders!
For if the king like not the comedy,
Why then, belike, he likes it not, perdy.
Come, some music!

Re-enter ROSENCRANTZ and GUILDENSTERN

GUILDENSTERN

Good my lord, vouchsafe me a word with you.

HAMLET

Sir, a whole history.

GUILDENSTERN

The king, sir,--

HAMLET

Ay, sir, what of him?

GUILDENSTERN

Is in his retirement marvellous distempered.

HAMLET

With drink, sir?

GUILDENSTERN

No, my lord, rather with choler.

HAMLET

Your wisdom should show itself more richer to
signify this to his doctor; for, for me to put him
to his purgation would perhaps plunge him into far
more choler.

GUILDENSTERN

Good my lord, put your discourse into some frame and
start not so wildly from my affair.

HAMLET

I am tame, sir: pronounce.

GUILDENSTERN

The queen, your mother, in most great affliction of
spirit, hath sent me to you.

HAMLET

You are welcome.

GUILDENSTERN

Nay, good my lord, this courtesy is not of the right
breed. If it shall please you to make me a
wholesome answer, I will do your mother's
commandment: if not, your pardon and my return
shall be the end of my business.

HAMLET

Sir, I cannot.

GUILDENSTERN

What, my lord?

HAMLET

Make you a wholesome answer; my wit's diseased: but,
sir, such answer as I can make, you shall command;
or, rather, as you say, my mother: therefore no
more, but to the matter: my mother, you say,--

ROSENCRANTZ

Then thus she says; your behavior hath struck her
into amazement and admiration.

HAMLET

O wonderful son, that can so astonish a mother! But
is there no sequel at the heels of this mother's
admiration? Impart.

ROSENCRANTZ

She desires to speak with you in her closet, ere you
go to bed.

HAMLET

We shall obey, were she ten times our mother. Have
you any further trade with us?

ROSENCRANTZ

My lord, you once did love me.

HAMLET

So I do still, by these pickers and stealers.

ROSENCRANTZ

Good my lord, what is your cause of distemper? you
do, surely, bar the door upon your own liberty, if
you deny your griefs to your friend.

HAMLET

Sir, I lack advancement.

ROSENCRANTZ

How can that be, when you have the voice of the king
himself for your succession in Denmark?

HAMLET

Ay, but sir, 'While the grass grows,'--the proverb
is something musty.

Re-enter Players with recorders

O, the recorders! let me see one. To withdraw with
you:--why do you go about to recover the wind of me,
as if you would drive me into a toil?

GUILDENSTERN

O, my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too
unmannerly.

HAMLET

I do not well understand that. Will you play upon
this pipe?

GUILDENSTERN

My lord, I cannot.

HAMLET

I pray you.

GUILDENSTERN

Believe me, I cannot.

HAMLET

I do beseech you.

GUILDENSTERN

I know no touch of it, my lord.

HAMLET

'Tis as easy as lying: govern these ventages with
your lingers and thumb, give it breath with your
mouth, and it will discourse most eloquent music.
Look you, these are the stops.

GUILDENSTERN

But these cannot I command to any utterance of
harmony; I have not the skill.

HAMLET

Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of
me! You would play upon me; you would seem to know
my stops; you would pluck out the heart of my
mystery; you would sound me from my lowest note to
the top of my compass: and there is much music,
excellent voice, in this little organ; yet cannot
you make it speak. 'Sblood, do you think I am
easier to be played on than a pipe? Call me what
instrument you will, though you can fret me, yet you
cannot play upon me.

Enter POLONIUS

God bless you, sir!

LORD POLONIUS

My lord, the queen would speak with you, and
presently.

HAMLET

Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel?

LORD POLONIUS

By the mass, and 'tis like a camel, indeed.

HAMLET

Methinks it is like a weasel.

LORD POLONIUS

It is backed like a weasel.

HAMLET

Or like a whale?

LORD POLONIUS

Very like a whale.

HAMLET

Then I will come to my mother by and by. They fool
me to the top of my bent. I will come by and by.

LORD POLONIUS

I will say so.

HAMLET

By and by is easily said.

Exit POLONIUS

Leave me, friends.

Exeunt all but HAMLET

Tis now the very witching time of night,
When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out
Contagion to this world: now could I drink hot blood,
And do such bitter business as the day
Would quake to look on. Soft! now to my mother.
O heart, lose not thy nature; let not ever
The soul of Nero enter this firm bosom:
Let me be cruel, not unnatural:
I will speak daggers to her, but use none;
My tongue and soul in this be hypocrites;
How in my words soever she be shent,
To give them seals never, my soul, consent!

Exit



Hamlet (Francia)

ACTE TROISIÈME
SCÈNE I

(Un appartement dans le château.)

LE ROI, LA REINE, POLONIUS, OPHÉLIA, ROSENCRANTZ ET GUILDENSTERN entrent.

LE ROI.—Et vous ne pouvez pas, en faisant dériver la conversation, savoir de lui pourquoi il montre ce désordre, déchirant si cruellement tous ses jours de repos par une turbulente et dangereuse démence?

ROSENCRANTZ.—Il avoue bien qu'il se sent lui-même dérouté; mais pour quel motif, il ne veut en aucune façon le dire.

GUILDENSTERN.—Et nous ne le trouvons pas disposé à se laisser sonder; mais avec une folie rusée, il nous échappe, quand nous voudrions l'amener à quelque aveu sur son véritable état.

LA REINE.—Vous a-t-il bien reçus?

ROSENCRANTZ.—Tout à fait en galant homme.

GUILDENSTERN.—Mais avec beaucoup d'effort dans sa manière.

ROSENCRANTZ.—Avare de paroles, mais quant à nos questions seulement; très-libre dans ses répliques.

LA REINE.—L'avez-vous provoqué à quelque passe-temps?

ROSENCRANTZ.—Madame, il s'est justement trouvé que nous avons rencontré sur notre chemin certains comédiens; nous lui avons parlé d'eux, et nous avons cru voir en lui une espèce de joie d'entendre cette nouvelle. Ils sont quelque part dans le palais; et, à ce que je crois, ils ont déjà l'ordre de jouer ce soir devant lui.

POLONIUS.—Cela est très-vrai, et il m'a prié d'engager Vos Majestés à entendre et à voir cette affaire.

LE ROI.—De tout mon coeur, et j'ai beaucoup de contentement à apprendre qu'il soit porté à cela. Mes chers messieurs, aiguisez encore en lui ce goût et poussez plus avant ses projets vers de tels plaisirs.

ROSENCRANTZ.—Ainsi ferons-nous, mon seigneur.

(Rosencrantz et Guildenstern sortent.)

LE ROI.—Douce Gertrude, laissez-nous aussi, car nous avons, sans nous découvrir, mandé Hamlet ici, afin qu'il y puisse, comme par hasard, se trouver en face d'Ophélia. Son père et moi, espions sans reproche, nous nous placerons de manière que, voyant sans être vus, nous puissions juger avec certitude de leur rencontre, et conclure d'après lui-même, selon qu'il se sera comporté, si c'est le renversement de son amour, ou non, qui le fait ainsi souffrir.

LA REINE.—Je vais vous obéir. Et quant à vous, Ophélia, je souhaite que vos rares beautés soient l'heureuse cause de l'égarement de Hamlet; car je pourrai ainsi espérer que vos vertus, au grand honneur de tous deux, le remettront dans la bonne voie.

OPHÉLIA.—Madame, je souhaite que cela se puisse.

(La reine sort.)

POLONIUS.—Ophélia, promenez-vous ici.... Gracieux maître, s'il vous plaît, nous irons nous placer. (A Ophélia.) Lisez dans ce livre; cette apparence d'une telle occupation pourra colorer votre solitude.... Nous sommes souvent blâmables en ceci.... la chose n'est que trop démontrée.... avec le visage de la dévotion et une démarche pieuse, nous faisons le diable lui-même blanc et doux comme sucre, de la tête aux pieds.

LE ROI (à part).—Oh! cela est trop vrai! De quelle cuisante lanière ce langage fouette ma conscience! La joue de la prostituée, savamment plâtrée d'une fausse beauté, n'est pas plus laide sous la matière dont elle s'aide, que ne l'est mon action sous mes paroles peintes et repeintes! O pesant fardeau!

POLONIUS.—Je l'entends venir, retirons-nous, mon seigneur. (Le roi et Polonius sortent.) (Hamlet entre).

HAMLET.—Être ou n'être pas, voilà la question.... Qu'y a-t-il de plus noble pour l'âme? supporter les coups de fronde et les flèches de la fortune outrageuse? ou s'armer en guerre contre un océan de misères et, de haute lutte, y couper court?... Mourir.... dormir.... plus rien.... et dire que, par un sommeil, nous mettons fin aux serrements de coeur et à ces mille attaques naturelles qui sont l'héritage de la chair! C'est un dénoûment qu'on doit souhaiter avec ferveur. Mourir.... dormir.... dormir! rêver peut-être? Ah! là est l'écueil; car dans ce sommeil de la mort, ce qui peut nous venir de rêves, quand nous nous sommes soustraits à tout ce tumulte humain, cela doit nous arrêter. Voilà la réflexion qui nous vaut cette calamité d'une si longue vie! Car qui supporterait les flagellations et les humiliations du présent, l'injustice de l'oppresseur, l'affront de l'homme orgueilleux, les angoisses de l'amour méprisé, les délais de la justice, l'insolence du pouvoir, et les violences que le mérite patient subit de la main des indignes?—quand il pourrait lui-même se donner son congé avec un simple poignard!—Qui voudrait porter ce fardeau, geindre et suer sous une vie accablante, n'était que la crainte de quelque chose après la mort, la contrée non découverte dont la frontière n'est repassée par aucun voyageur, embarrasse la volonté et nous fait supporter les maux que nous avons, plutôt que de fuir vers ceux que nous ne connaissons pas? Ainsi la conscience fait de nous autant de lâches; ainsi la couleur native de la résolution est toute blêmie par le pâle reflet de la pensée, et telle ou telle entreprise d'un grand élan et d'une grande portée, à cet aspect, se détourne de son cours et manque à mériter le nom d'action.... Doucement, maintenant! Voici la belle Ophélia. Nymphe, dans tes oraisons, puissent tous mes péchés être rappelés!

OPHÉLIA.—Mon bon seigneur, comment se porte Votre Honneur depuis tant de jours?

HAMLET.—Je vous remercie humblement. Bien, bien, bien.

OPHÉLIA.—Mon seigneur, j'ai de vous des souvenirs que, depuis longtemps, il me tarde de vous rendre; je vous prie, recevez-les maintenant.

HAMLET.—Non, ce n'est pas moi; je ne vous ai jamais rien donné.

OPHÉLIA.—Mon honoré seigneur, vous savez bien que si; et même avec ces dons allaient des paroles faites d'une si suave haleine qu'elles rendaient les choses plus précieuses; leur parfum est perdu, reprenez-les; car pour une âme noble, le plus riche bienfait devient pauvre lorsque le bienfaiteur se montre malveillant. Les voici, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Ah! ah! êtes-vous honnête?

OPHÉLIA.—Mon seigneur?

HAMLET.—Êtes-vous belle?

OPHÉLIA.—Que veut dire Votre Seigneurie?

HAMLET.—Que si vous êtes honnête et belle, il faut bien prendre garde que votre beauté n'ait aucun commerce avec votre honnêteté.

OPHÉLIA.—Mais la beauté, mon seigneur, peut-elle être en meilleure compagnie qu'avec l'honnêteté?

HAMLET.—Oui, vraiment; car le pouvoir de la beauté aura transformé l'honnêteté, de ce qu'elle est, en une sale entremetteuse plus tôt que la force de l'honnêteté n'aura transfiguré la beauté à son image. C'était, il y a quelque temps, un paradoxe, mais le temps présent le prouve. Je vous ai aimée jadis.

OPHÉLIA.—En vérité, mon seigneur, vous me l'avez fait croire.

HAMLET.—Vous n'auriez pas dû me croire; car la vertu a beau greffer notre vieille souche, nous nous sentirons toujours de noire origine. Je ne vous aimais pas.

OPHÉLIA.—Je n'en ai été que plus déçue.

HAMLET.—Va-t'en dans un cloître. Pourquoi voudrais-tu te faire mère et nourrice de pécheurs? Je suis moi-même passablement honnête, et pourtant je pourrais m'accuser de choses telles qu'il vaudrait mieux que ma mère ne m'eût pas mis au monde; je suis très-orgueilleux, vindicatif, ambitieux; j'ai en cortège autour de moi plus de péchés que je n'ai de pensées pour les loger, d'imagination pour leur donner une forme, ou de temps pour les commettre. Qu'est-ce que des gens comme moi ont à faire de traînasser entre la terre et le ciel? Nous sommes tous de fieffés coquins, ne crois aucun de nous. Va-t'en droit ton chemin jusqu'à un cloître. Où est votre père?

OPHÉLIA.—À la maison, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Qu'on ferme la porte sur lui, afin qu'il ne puisse pas jouer le rôle d'un sot ailleurs qu'en sa propre maison. Adieu!

OPHÉLIA.—Oh! secourez-le, cieux cléments!

HAMLET.—Si tu te maries, je te donnerai pour dot cette malédiction; sois aussi chaste que la glace, aussi pure que la neige, tu n'échapperas pas à la calomnie. Va-t'en dans un cloître; adieu! Ou si tu veux à toute force te marier, épouse un sot; car les hommes sages savent bien quels monstres vous faites d'eux. Au cloître, allons, et au plus vite! Adieu.

OPHÉLIA.—O puissances célestes, guérissez-le!

HAMLET.—J'ai aussi entendu parler de vos peintures, bien à ma suffisance. Dieu vous a donné un visage, et vous vous en faites vous-mêmes un autre. Vous dansez, vous trottez, vous chuchotez, vous débaptisez les créatures de Dieu, et vous mettez votre frivolité sur le compte de votre ignorance. Allez, je ne veux plus de cela; c'est cela qui m'a rendu fou. Je vous le dis, nous ne ferons plus de mariage; ceux qui sont mariés déjà vivront ainsi, tous, excepté un; les autres resteront comme ils sont. Au cloître! Allez.

(Hamlet sort.)

OPHÉLIA.—Oh! quel noble esprit est là en ruines! Courtisan, soldat, savant, le regard, la langue, l'épée! L'attente et la fleur de ce beau royaume, le miroir de la mode et le moule des bonnes formes, le seul observé de tous les observateurs, tout à fait, tout à fait à bas! Et moi, de toutes les femmes la plus accablée et la plus misérable, moi qui ai sucé le miel de ses voeux mélodieux, maintenant je vois cette noble et tout à fait souveraine raison, telle que les plus douces cloches quand elles se fêlent, rendre des sons faux et durs! cette forme incomparable et ces traits de jeunesse épanouie flétris par de tels transports! Oh! le malheur est sur moi! Avoir vu ce que j'ai vu et voir ce que je vois!

(Le roi et Polonius rentrent.)

LE ROI.—L'amour? non, ses affections ne suivent pas cette route; et ce qu'il disait, quoique manquant un peu de suite, ne ressemblait pas à de la folie. Il y a dans son âme quelque chose sur quoi sa mélancolie s'est établie à couver, et je soupçonne fort que l'éclosion et le produit seront quelque danger. Pour le prévenir, je viens, par une résolution vive, de régler tout ainsi: il partira en hâte pour l'Angleterre, et ira réclamer nos tributs négligés. Peut-être les mers, la différence des pays et la varieté des objets, pourront-elles chasser ce je ne sais quoi qui est l'idée fixe de son coeur et où se heurte sans cesse son cerveau qui le jette ainsi hors de l'usage de lui-même. Qu'en pensez-vous?

POLONIUS.—Cela fera bon effet; mais néanmoins je crois que l'origine et le commencement de son chagrin proviennent d'un amour maltraité.—Eh bien! Ophélia, vous n'avez pas besoin de nous dire ce que le seigneur Hamlet a dit; nous avons tout entendu.—Mon seigneur, agissez comme il vous plait; mais, si vous le trouvez bon, faites qu'après la représentation, la reine sa mère, toute seule avec lui, le presse de dévoiler son chagrin. Qu'elle le traite rondement; et moi, si tel est votre bon plaisir, je me placerai dans le vent de toute leur conversation. Si elle ne le pénètre pas, envoyez-le en Angleterre, ou confinez-le dans le lieu que votre sagesse croira le meilleur.

LE ROI.—C'est ce que nous ferons; la folie d'un homme de haut rang ne peut rester sans surveillance.

(Ils sortent.)


SCÈNE II

(Une salle dans le château.)

HAMLET entre avec quelques comédiens.

HAMLET.—Dites ce discours, je vous prie, comme je l'ai prononcé devant vous, en le laissant légèrement courir sur la langue; mais si vous le déclamez à pleine bouche, comme font beaucoup de nos acteurs, j'aurais tout aussi bien pour agréable que mes vers fussent dits par le crieur de la ville. N'allez pas non plus trop scier l'air en long et en large avec votre main, de cette façon; mais usez de tout sobrement car dans le torrent même et la tempête et, pour ainsi dire, le tourbillon de votre passion, vous devez prendre sur vous et garder une tempérance qui puisse lui donner une douceur coulante. Oh! cela me choque dans l'âme d'entendre un robuste gaillard, grossi d'une perruque, déchiqueter une passion, la mettre en lambeaux, en vrais haillons, pour fendre les oreilles du parterre, qui, le plus souvent, n'est à la hauteur que d'une absurde pantomime muette, ou de beaucoup de bruit. Je voudrais qu'un tel gaillard fût fouetté, pour charger ainsi les Termagants; c'est se faire plus Hérode qu'Hérode lui-même. Je vous en prie, évitez cela.

PREMIER COMÉDIEN.—J'assure Votre Altesse....

HAMLET.—Ne soyez pas non plus trop apprivoisé, mais que votre propre discernement soit votre guide; réglez l'action sur les paroles, et les paroles sur l'action, avec une attention particulière à n'outre-passer jamais la convenance de la nature; car toute chose ainsi outrée s'écarte de la donnée même du théâtre, dont le but, dès le premier jour comme aujourd'hui, a été et est encore de présenter, pour ainsi parler, un miroir à la nature; de montrer à la vertu ses propres traits, à l'infamie sa propre image, à chaque âge et à chaque incarnation du temps sa forme et son empreinte. Tout cela donc, si vous outrez ou si vous restez en deçà, quoique cela puisse faire rire l'ignorant, ne peut que faire peine à l'homme judicieux, dont la censure, fût-il seul, doit, dans votre opinion, avoir plus de poids qu'une pleine salle d'autres spectateurs. Oh! il y a des comédiens que j'ai vus jouer,—et je les ai entendu vanter par d'autres personnes, et vanter grandement, pour ne pas dire grossement, qui, n'ayant ni voix de chrétiens, ni démarche de chrétiens, ni de païens, ni d'hommes se carraient et beuglaient au point de m'avoir donné à penser que quelques-uns des manouvriers de la nature avaient fait des hommes et ne les avaient pas bien faits, tant ces gens-là imitaient abominablement l'humanité!

PREMIER COMÉDIEN.—J'espère que nous avons passablement réformé cela chez nous.

HAMLET.—Ah! réformez-le tout à fait. Et que ceux qui jouent vos clowns n'en disent pas plus qu'on n'en a écrit dans leur rôle; car il y en a qui se mettent à rire eux-mêmes, pour mettre en train de rire un certain nombre de spectateurs imbéciles. Cependant, à ce moment-là même, il y a peut-être quelque situation essentielle de la pièce qui exige l'attention. Cela est détestable, et montre la plus pitoyable prétention de la part du sot qui use de ce moyen. Allez, préparez-vous. (Les comédiens sortent.)—(Polonius, Rosencrantz et Guildenstern entrent.) Où en sommes-nous, mon seigneur? Le roi veut-il entendre ce chef-d'oeuvre?

POLONIUS.—Oui, et la reine aussi, et cela tout de suite.

HAMLET.—Dites aux acteurs de faire hâte. (Polonius sort.) Voulez-vous tous deux aller aussi les presser?

TOUS DEUX.—Oui, mon seigneur.

(Horatio entre.) (Rosencrantz et Guildenstern sortent.)

HAMLET.—Qu'est-ce? Ah! Horatio!

HORATIO.—Me voici, mon doux seigneur, à votre service.

HAMLET.—Horatio, tu es de tout point l'homme le plus juste que jamais ma pratique du monde m'ait fait rencontrer.

HORATIO.—Oh! mon cher seigneur!

HAMLET.—Non, ne crois pas que je flatte; car quel avantage puis-je espérer de toi qui n'as d'autre revenu que ton bon courage, pour te nourrir et t'habiller? Pourquoi le pauvre serait-il flatté? Non! Que la langue doucereuse aille lécher la pompe stupide! que les charnières moelleuses du genou se courbent là où le profit récompense la servilité!... M'entends-tu bien? depuis que mon âme tendre a été maîtresse de son choix et a pu distinguer parmi les hommes, elle t'a pour elle-même marqué du sceau de son élection; car tu as été, en souffrant tout, comme un homme qui ne souffre rien, un homme qui, des rebuffades de la fortune à ses faveurs, a tout pris avec des remerciments égaux; et bénis sont ceux-là dont le sang et le jugement ont été si bien combinés, qu'ils ne sont pas des pipeaux faits pour les doigts de la fortune et prêts à chanter par le trou qui lui plait! Donnez-moi l'homme qui n'est point l'esclave de la passion, et je le porterai dans le fond de mon coeur, oui, dans le coeur de mon coeur, comme je fais de toi.... Mais en voilà un peu trop à ce sujet. On joue ce soir une pièce devant le roi, une des scènes se rapproche fort des circonstances que je t'ai racontées sur la mort de mon père. Je te prie, quand tu verras cet acte en train, aussitôt, avec la plus intime pénétration de ton âme, observe mon oncle. Si son crime caché ne se débusque pas de lui-même, à une certaine tirade, c'est un esprit infernal que nous avons vu, et mes imaginations sont aussi noires que l'enclume de Vulcain. Surveille-le attentivement. Quant à moi, je riverai mes yeux sur son visage, et ensuite, nous réunirons nos deux jugements pour prononcer sur ce qu'il aura laissé voir.

HORATIO.—Bien, mon seigneur. S'il nous dérobe rien, pendant que la pièce sera jouée, et s'il échappe aux recherches, je prends ce vol-là à mon compte.

HAMLET.—Ils viennent pour la pièce; il faut que je flâne; trouvez une place.

(Marche danoise; fanfare. Le roi, la reine, Polonius, Ophélia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern et autres entrent.)

LE ROI.—Comment se porte notre cousin Hamlet?

HAMLET.—A merveille, sur ma foi! vivant des reliefs du caméléon, je mange de l'air, et je m'engraisse de promesses. Vous ne pourriez pas mettre vos chapons à ce régime.

LE ROI.—Je n'ai rien à voir dans cette réponse, Hamlet; je ne suis pour rien dans ces paroles.

HAMLET.—Ni moi non plus, désormais. (À Polonius.) Mon seigneur, vous avez joué la comédie autrefois à l'Université, dites-vous?

POLONIUS.—Oui, mon seigneur, je l'ai jouée, et je passais pour bon acteur.

HAMLET.—Et qu'avez-vous joué?

POLONIUS.—J'ai joué Jules César. Je fus tué au Capitole, Brutus me tua.

HAMLET.—Il joua un rôle de brute, en tuant en pareil lieu un veau d'une si capitale importance. Les comédiens sont-ils prêts?

ROSENCRANTZ.—Oui, mon seigneur, ils n'attendent que votre permission.

LA REINE.—Venez ici, mon cher Hamlet, asseyez-vous près de moi.

HAMLET.—Non, ma bonne mère, voici un aimant qui a plus de force d'attraction.

POLONIUS, au roi.—Oh! oh! remarquez-vous ceci?

HAMLET, s'asseyant aux pieds d'Ophélia.—Madame, me coucherai-je entre vos genoux?

OPHÉLIA.—Non, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Je veux dire la tête sur vos genoux.

OPHÉLIA.—Oui, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Pensez-vous donc que j'aie eu dans l'esprit un propos de manant?

OPHÉLIA.—Je ne pense rien, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Ce n'est pas une vilaine pensée que celle de s'étendre parmi des jambes de jeunes filles.

OPHÉLIA.—Comment, mon seigneur?

HAMLET.—Rien.

OPHÉLIA.—Vous êtes gai, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Qui, moi?

OPHÉLIA.—Oui, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Oh! je ne suis que votre bouffon. Qu'est-ce que l'homme peut faire de mieux que de s'égayer? car, voyez comme ma mère a l'air joyeux... et il n'y a pas deux heures que mon père est mort.

OPHÉLIA.—Mais non, mon seigneur, il y a deux mois.

HAMLET.—Si longtemps? eh bien, que le diable porte le noir! Pour moi, je veux avoir un assortiment de martre zibeline. Oh, ciel! mort depuis deux mois et pas encore oublié? Alors il y a de l'espoir pour que la mémoire d'un grand homme survive à sa vie la moitié d'une année; mais, par Notre-Dame, il faut alors qu'il bâtisse des églises; autrement, il aura à souffrir du mal de non-souvenance, avec le pauvre dada de bois, dont l'épitaphe est connue:

«Car oh! car oh! le dada de bois, «Le dada de bois est oublié!»


(Les trompettes sonnent; suit une pantomime: un roi et une reine entrent d'un air fort amoureux. La reine l'embrasse, et il embrasse la reine, elle se met à genoux devant lui, et par gestes lui proteste de son amour. Il la relève, et penche la tête sur son épaule. Il se couche sur un banc couvert de fleurs. Le voyant endormi, elle se retire. Alors survient un autre personnage, qui lui enlève sa couronne, la baise, puis verse du poison dans l'oreille du roi, et s'en va. La reine revient, elle trouve le roi mort, et fait des gestes de désespoir. L'empoisonneur arrive avec deux ou trois acteurs muets, et semble se lamenter avec elle. On emporte le corps. L'empoisonneur offre à la reine des présents de mariage; elle paraît un moment les repousser et les refuser; mais à la fin, elle accepte le gage de son amour. Les comédiens sortent.)


OPHÉLIA.—Que veut dire cela, mon seigneur?

HAMLET.—Ma foi! c'est l'embûche de la méchanceté; cela veut dire: crime.

OPHÉLIA.—Sans doute cette pantomime indique le sujet de la pièce.

(Le Prologue entre.)

HAMLET.—Nous allons le savoir de ce garçon-là. Les comédiens ne peuvent garder un secret, ils nous diront tout.

OPHÉLIA.—Nous dira-t-il ce que signifiait cette pantomime?

HAMLET.—Oui, et toute autre pantomime que vous voudrez lui mimer. N'ayez pas honte, vous, de faire le spectacle, et lui, il n'aura pas honte de vous faire le commentaire.

OPHÉLIA.—Vous êtes un vaurien, vous êtes un vaurien. Je veux écouter la pièce.

LE PROLOGUE.—Pour nous et pour notre tragédie, nous agenouillant ici devant votre clémence, nous implorons de vous audience et patience.

HAMLET.—Est-ce là un prologue, ou la devise d'une bague?

OPHÉLIA.—C'est bref, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Comme l'amour d'une femme.

(Un roi et une reine entrent.)

LE ROI DE LA COMÉDIE.—Trente fois le chariot de Phébus a fait le tour entier du bassin salé de Neptune et du sol arrondi de Tellus, et trente fois douze lunes, de leur splendeur empruntée, ont marqué autour du monde douze fois trente étapes du temps, depuis que l'amour a uni nos coeurs, et l'hymen nos mains, par la réciprocité des liens les plus sacrés.

LA REINE DE LA COMÉDIE.—Ah! puissent le soleil et la lune nous faire encore compter leurs voyages en aussi grand nombre, ayant que c'en soit fait de l'amour! mais, malheureuse que je suis! vous êtes si malade depuis quelque temps, si loin de l'allégresse et de votre ancienne façon d'être, que je suis défiante à votre sujet. Cependant, quoique je me défie, cela ne doit en rien, mon seigneur, vous décourager: car les craintes et les tendresses des femmes vont par égales quantités, pareillement nulles, ou pareillement extrêmes. Maintenant, ce qu'est mon amour, l'expérience vous l'a fait connaître, et la mesure de mon amour est celle de ma crainte aussi. Là où l'amour est grand, les plus petits soupçons sont une crainte; là où les petites craintes deviennent grandes, là croissent les grandes amours.

LE ROI DE LA COMÉDIE.—Oui, vraiment, mon amour, je dois te dire adieu, et bientôt sans doute; mes forces actives renoncent à accomplir leurs fonctions; et toi, tu resteras en arrière, à vivre en ce monde si beau, honorée, chérie; et peut-être un autre aussi tendre sera-t-il, par toi, comme époux.....

LA REINE DE LA COMÉDIE.—Ah! supprimez le reste! Un tel amour, dans mon sein, ne pourrait être qu'une trahison. Un second époux, ah! que je sois maudite en lui! Nulle n'épousa le second sans avoir tué le premier.

HAMLET (à part).—Voilà l'absinthe! voilà l'absinthe!

LA REINE DE LA COMÉDIE.—Les motifs qui amènent un second mariage sont de basses raisons de gain, non des raisons d'amour. Je tue une seconde fois mon époux mort, quand un second époux m'embrasse dans mon lit.

LE ROI DE LA COMÉDIE.—Je vous crois, vous pensez ce que vous dites maintenant. Mais ce que nous décidons, il nous arrive souvent de l'enfreindre. Un dessein n'est rien de plus qu'un esclave de notre mémoire et, violemment né, est pauvre en validité. Aujourd'hui, comme un fruit vert, il tient à l'arbre; mais il tombe même sans secousse, quand il est mûr. De toute nécessité, nous oublions de nous payer à nous-mêmes la dette où nous sommes seuls nos propres créanciers. Ce que, dans la passion, nous nous proposons à nous-mêmes, devient hors de propos quand la passion est finie. La violence des peines ou des joies, en les détruisant elles-mêmes, détruit aussi les ordonnances qu'elles s'étaient signifiées. Là où la joie s'ébat le plus, là où se lamente le plus la peine, la peine s'égaye et la joie s'attriste au plus léger accident. Ce monde n'est pas pour toujours, et il n'est pas étrange que nos amours mêmes changent avec nos fortunes. Car cette question nous reste encore à décider: Est-ce l'amour qui mène la fortune, ou bien la fortune l'amour? Que le grand homme soit à bas, voyez-vous, son favori s'envole. Que le pauvre monte, il fait de ses ennemis autant d'amis, et jusqu'à ce jour l'amour s'est dirigé d'après la fortune; car celui qui n'a pas besoin ne manque jamais d'un ami, et celui qui, par nécessité, met à l'épreuve une de ces amitiés creuses, la fait aussitôt tourner en inimitié. Mais pour revenir en règle conclure là où j'ai commencé, nos volontés et nos destinées se contrarient tellement dans leur course, que nos plans sont toujours renversés. Nôtres sont nos pensées, mais leur issue n'est pas nôtre. Pense donc que tu ne veux jamais t'unir à un second époux: tes pensées pourront mourir, quand ton premier seigneur sera mort.

LA REINE DE LA COMÉDIE.—Alors, que la terre ne me donne plus la nourriture, ni le ciel la lumière! Que les jeux et le repos me soient jour et nuit fermés! Puissent en désespoir se changer ma foi et mon espérance! Puisse au fond d'une prison et aux plaisirs d'un anachorète se borner ma carrière! Puissent tous les revers qui décontenancent le visage de la joie rencontrer mes meilleurs souhaits et les détruire! Et que, dans ce monde et dans l'autre, je sois poursuivie par le plus durable tourment, si, veuve une fois, je redeviens jamais femme!

HAMLET, à Ophélia.—Maintenant, si elle manquait à son serment....

LE ROI DE LA COMÉDIE.—Voilà de profonds serments. Douce amie, laisse-moi seul ici pour un peu de temps. Mes esprits s'appesantissent, et je voudrais tromper par le sommeil l'ennui traînant du jour.

(Il s'endort.)

LA REINE DE LA COMÉDIE.—Que le sommeil berce ton cerveau, et que jamais le malheur ne vienne se glisser entre nous deux.

(Elle sort.)

HAMLET.—Madame, comment vous plaît cette pièce?

LA REINE.—La reine fait trop de protestations, ce me semble.

HAMLET.—Oh! mais elle tiendra sa parole.

LE ROI.—Connaissez-vous le sujet de la pièce? N'y a-t-il rien qui puisse blesser?

HAMLET.—Non, non; ils ne font que rire; ils empoisonnent pour rire; il n'y a rien au monde de blessant.

LE ROI.—Comment appelez-vous la pièce?

HAMLET.—La Souricière. Et pourquoi cela, direz-vous? Par métaphore. Cette pièce est la représentation d'un meurtre commis à Vienne. Le duc s'appelle Gonzague, et sa femme Baptista. Vous verrez tout à l'heure. C'est un chef-d'oeuvre de scélératesse; mais qu'importe? Votre Majesté, et nous, qui avons la conscience libre, cela ne nous touche en rien. Que la haridelle écorchée rue, si le bât la blesse: notre garrot n'est pas entamé. (Lucianus entre.) Celui-là est un certain Lucianus, neveu du roi.

OPHÉLIA.—Vous êtes d'aussi bon secours que le Choeur, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Je pourrais dire le dialogue entre vous et votre amant, si je voyais jouer les marionnettes.

OPHÉLIA.—Vous êtes piquant, mon seigneur, vous êtes piquant.

HAMLET.—Il ne vous en coûterait qu'un soupir, et la pointe serait émoussée.

OPHÉLIA.—De mieux en mieux, mais de pis en pis.

HAMLET.—Oui, comme vous vous méprenez quand vous prenez vos maris! Commence donc, assassin! Cesse tes maudites grimaces, et commence. Allons! Le corbeau croassant hurle pour avoir sa vengeance!

LUCIANUS.—Noire pensée, bras dispos, drogue appropriée, moment favorable, occasion complice! Nulle autre créature qui voie! O toi, mélange violent d'herbes sauvages recueillies à minuit, trois fois flétries, trois fois infectées par l'imprécation d'Hécate, que ta nature magique et ta cruelle puissance envahissent sans retard la vie encore saine!

(Il verse du poison dans l'oreille du roi endormi.)

HAMLET.—Il l'empoisonne dans le jardin pour s'emparer de ses possessions.—Son nom est Gonzague. L'histoire existe, écrite en italien, style de premier choix. Vous verrez tout à l'heure comment l'assassin acquiert l'amour delà femme de Gonzague.

OPHÉLIA.—Le roi se lève!

HAMLET.—Quoi! effrayé par un feu follet?

LA REINE.—Qu'avez-vous, mon seigneur?

POLONIUS.—Laissez-là la pièce!

LE ROI.—Donnez-moi de la lumière! Sortons.

POLONIUS.—Des lumières! des lumières! des lumières!

(Tous sortent hormis Hamlet et Horatio.)

HAMLET.—«Eh bien! que le daim frappé s'échappe et pleure; que le cerf non blessé se joue! Les uns doivent veiller, les autres doivent dormir. Ainsi va le monde.» Ne croyez-vous pas, monsieur, qu'un coup de théâtre comme celui-ci, avec accompagnement d'une forêt de plumes sur la tête, et deux roses de Provins sur des souliers tailladés, pourrait, si la fortune, par la suite, me traitait de Turc à More, me faire recevoir compagnon dans une meute de comédiens?

HORATIO.—À demi-part.

HAMLET.—A part entière, vous dis-je!

«Car tu sais, bien-aimé Damon, que ce royaume démantélé appartenant à Jupiter lui-même, et maintenant règne en ces lieux un vrai... un vrai... un vrai paon.»

HORATIO.—Vous auriez pu mettre la rime.

HAMLET.—Oh! mon cher Horatio! à présent je tiendrais mille livres sterling sur la parole du fantôme. As-tu remarqué?

HORATIO.—Très-bien, monseigneur.

HAMLET.—Quand il a été question de l'empoisonnement....

HORATIO.—Je l'ai très-bien remarqué!

HAMLET.—Ah! ah!—Allons, un peu de musique! les flageolets!

«Car si le roi n'aime pas la comédie, eh bien! alors probablement.....c'est qu'il ne l'aime pas pardieu!»

(Rosencrantz et Guildenstern entrent.)

Allons! un peu de musique.

GUILDENSTERN.—Mon bon seigneur, accordez-moi la grâce de vous dire un mot.

HAMLET.—Toute une histoire, monsieur.

GUILDENSTERN.—Le roi, monsieur....

HAMLET.—Ah! oui, monsieur. Quelles nouvelles de lui?

GUILDENSTERN.—Il est dans son appartement, singulièrement indisposé.

HAMLET.—Par la boisson, monsieur?

GUILDENSTERN.—Non, mon seigneur, par la colère.

HAMLET.—Votre sagesse se serait montrée mieux en fonds, en instruisant de ceci le médecin; car, quant à moi, me charger de lui porter des purgatifs, ce serait peut-être le plonger encore plus avant dans le cholérique.

GUILDENSTERN.—Mon bon seigneur, mettez quelque règle à vos discours, et ne faites pas ces bonds sauvages hors de mon sujet.

HAMLET.—Je suis apprivoisé, monsieur; parlez.

GUILDENSTERN.—La reine votre mère, dans une très-grande affliction d'esprit, m'a envoyé vers vous.

HAMLET.—Vous êtes le bienvenu.

GUILDENSTERN.—Non, mon seigneur, cette courtoisie n'est pas de race franche. S'il vous plaît de me faire une saine réponse, j'exécuterai les ordres de votre mère; sinon, votre pardon et mon retour mettront fin à mon office.

HAMLET.—Monsieur, je ne puis....

GUILDENSTERN.—Quoi, mon seigneur?

HAMLET.—.... Vous faire une saine réponse; mon esprit est malade. Mais, monsieur, ma réponse, telle que je puis la faire, est bien à votre service, ou plutôt, comme vous dites, à celui de ma mère. Ainsi, sans plus de paroles, venons au fait: ma mère, dites-vous....?

ROSENCRANTZ.—Voici ce qu'elle dit: votre conduite l'a frappée de surprise et de stupéfaction.

HAMLET.—O fils prodigieux, qui peut ainsi étonner sa mère! Mais la stupéfaction de cette mère n'a-t-elle pas quelque suite qui lui coure surles talons? Instruisez-moi.

ROSENCRANTZ.—Elle désire causer avec vous dans son cabinet, avant que vous alliez vous coucher.

HAMLET.—Nous obéirons, fût-elle dix fois notre mère. Avez-vous quelque autre affaire à traiter avec nous?

ROSENCRANTZ.—Mon seigneur, il fut un temps où vous m'aimiez.

HAMLET.—Et je vous aime encore, par la pilleuse que voici et la voleuse que voilà!

ROSENCRANTZ.—Mon bon seigneur, quelle est la cause de votre trouble? C'est assurément fermer la porte à votre propre délivrance que de refuser vos chagrins à votre ami.

HAMLET.—Monsieur, ce qui me manque, c'est de l'avancement.

ROSENCRANTZ.—Gomment cela se peut-il, lorsque vous avez la voix du roi lui-même, en gage de votre succession à la couronne du Danemark?

HAMLET.—Oui; mais «pendant que l'herbe pousse...;» le proverbe lui-même s'est un peu moisi. (Des comédiens et des joueurs de flageolets entrent.) Ah! les joueurs de flageolets! Voyons-en un. (À Guildenstern.) Me retirer avec vous! Pourquoi tourner autour de moi, et flairer ma piste comme si vous vouliez me pousser dans un piège?

GUILDENSTERN.—Ah! mon seigneur, si mes devoirs envers le roi me rendent trop hardi, c'est aussi mon amour pour vous qui me rend importun.

HAMLET.—Je n'entends pas bien cela. Voulez-vous jouer de cette flûte?

GUILDENSTERN.—Mon seigneur, je ne puis.

HAMLET.—Je vous prie.

GUILDENSTERN.—Croyez-moi; je ne puis.

HAMLET.—Je vous en conjure.

GUILDENSTERN.—Je n'en connais pas une seule touche, mon seigneur.

HAMLET.—Cela est aussi aisé que de mentir. Gouvernez ces prises d'air avec les doigts et le pouce, animez l'instrument du souffle de votre bouche, et il se mettra à discourir en très-éloquente musique. Voyez-vous? Voici les soupapes.

GUILDENSTERN.—Mais je ne saurais les faire obéir à l'expression d'aucune harmonie. Je n'ai pas le talent requis.

HAMLET.—Eh bien! voyez maintenant quelle indigne chose vous faites de moi! Vous voudriez jouer de moi; vous voudriez avoir l'air de connaître mes soupapes, vous voudriez me tirer de vive force Pâme de mon secret; vous voudriez me faire résonner, depuis ma note la plus basse jusqu'au haut de ma gamme. Il y a beaucoup de musique, il y a une voix excellente dans ce petit tuyau d'orgue; et pourtant vous ne pouvez le faire parler. Par la sang-bleu! pensez-vous qu'il soit plus aisé de jouer de moi que d'une flûte? Prenez-moi pour tel instrument que vous voudrez; vous pouvez bien tourmenter mes touches, vous ne pouvez pas jouer de moi. (Polonius entre.) Dieu vous bénisse, monsieur!

POLONIUS.—Mon seigneur, la reine voudrait vous parler, et à l'heure même.

HAMLET.—Voyez-vous ce nuage, qui a presque la forme d'un chameau?

POLONIUS.—Par la sainte messe, il ressemble à un chameau, en vérité!

HAMLET.—Je crois qu'il ressemble à une belette.

POLONIUS.—Il a comme un dos de belette.

HAMLET.—Ou de baleine?

POLONIUS,—Oui, tout à fait de baleine.

HAMLET.—Ainsi, j'irai donc trouver ma mère tout à l'heure... L'arc est à bout de corde; ils me tirent à me rendre fou... J'irai tout à l'heure.

POLONIUS—Je le lui dirai.

(Polonius sort.)

HAMLET.—Tout à l'heure est aisé à dire. Laissez-moi, mes amis. (Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Horatio, etc., sortent.) Voici justement l'heure de la nuit, cette heure qui ensorcelle, l'heure où les cimetières bâillent et où l'enfer même souffle sur ce monde la contagion. Maintenant, je pourrais boire du sang chaud et faire des actions si amères que le jour frémirait de les regarder... Doucement! chez ma mère, maintenant? O mon coeur! ne perds pas ta nature; que jamais l'âme de Néron ne pénètre dans cette ferme poitrine; soyons cruel, mais-non dénaturé: je lui parlerai de poignards, mais je n'en mettrai point en usage. Ma langue et mon âme, soyez hypocrites en ceci, et de quelque façon que mes discours puissent frapper sur elle,—quant à les sceller des sceaux qui font agir, ô mon âme! n'y consens jamais!

(Il sort.)



minimap