Ez az oldal sütiket használ

A portál felületén sütiket (cookies) használ, vagyis a rendszer adatokat tárol az Ön böngészőjében. A sütik személyek azonosítására nem alkalmasak, szolgáltatásaink biztosításához szükségesek. Az oldal használatával Ön beleegyezik a sütik használatába.

Hírek

Shakespeare, William: János király (Részlet) (King John (Detail) Magyar nyelven)

Shakespeare, William portréja

King John (Detail) (Angol)


ACT I
SCENE I.
KING JOHN'S palace.

Enter KING JOHN, QUEEN ELINOR, PEMBROKE, ESSEX, SALISBURY, and others, with CHATILLON

KING JOHN

Now, say, Chatillon, what would France with us?

CHATILLON

Thus, after greeting, speaks the King of France
In my behavior to the majesty,
The borrow'd majesty, of England here.

QUEEN ELINOR

A strange beginning: 'borrow'd majesty!'

KING JOHN

Silence, good mother; hear the embassy.

CHATILLON

Philip of France, in right and true behalf
Of thy deceased brother Geffrey's son,
Arthur Plantagenet, lays most lawful claim
To this fair island and the territories,
To Ireland, Poictiers, Anjou, Touraine, Maine,
Desiring thee to lay aside the sword
Which sways usurpingly these several titles,
And put these same into young Arthur's hand,
Thy nephew and right royal sovereign.

KING JOHN

What follows if we disallow of this?

CHATILLON

The proud control of fierce and bloody war,
To enforce these rights so forcibly withheld.

KING JOHN

Here have we war for war and blood for blood,
Controlment for controlment: so answer France.

CHATILLON

Then take my king's defiance from my mouth,
The farthest limit of my embassy.

KING JOHN

Bear mine to him, and so depart in peace:
Be thou as lightning in the eyes of France;
For ere thou canst report I will be there,
The thunder of my cannon shall be heard:
So hence! Be thou the trumpet of our wrath
And sullen presage of your own decay.
An honourable conduct let him have:
Pembroke, look to 't. Farewell, Chatillon.

Exeunt CHATILLON and PEMBROKE

QUEEN ELINOR

What now, my son! have I not ever said
How that ambitious Constance would not cease
Till she had kindled France and all the world,
Upon the right and party of her son?
This might have been prevented and made whole
With very easy arguments of love,
Which now the manage of two kingdoms must
With fearful bloody issue arbitrate.

KING JOHN

Our strong possession and our right for us.

QUEEN ELINOR

Your strong possession much more than your right,
Or else it must go wrong with you and me:
So much my conscience whispers in your ear,
Which none but heaven and you and I shall hear.

Enter a Sheriff

ESSEX

My liege, here is the strangest controversy
Come from country to be judged by you,
That e'er I heard: shall I produce the men?

KING JOHN

Let them approach.
Our abbeys and our priories shall pay
This expedition's charge.

Enter ROBERT and the BASTARD

What men are you?

BASTARD

Your faithful subject I, a gentleman
Born in Northamptonshire and eldest son,
As I suppose, to Robert Faulconbridge,
A soldier, by the honour-giving hand
Of Coeur-de-lion knighted in the field.

KING JOHN

What art thou?

ROBERT

The son and heir to that same Faulconbridge.

KING JOHN

Is that the elder, and art thou the heir?
You came not of one mother then, it seems.

BASTARD

Most certain of one mother, mighty king;
That is well known; and, as I think, one father:
But for the certain knowledge of that truth
I put you o'er to heaven and to my mother:
Of that I doubt, as all men's children may.

QUEEN ELINOR

Out on thee, rude man! thou dost shame thy mother
And wound her honour with this diffidence.

BASTARD

I, madam? no, I have no reason for it;
That is my brother's plea and none of mine;
The which if he can prove, a' pops me out
At least from fair five hundred pound a year:
Heaven guard my mother's honour and my land!

KING JOHN

A good blunt fellow. Why, being younger born,
Doth he lay claim to thine inheritance?

BASTARD

I know not why, except to get the land.
But once he slander'd me with bastardy:
But whether I be as true begot or no,
That still I lay upon my mother's head,
But that I am as well begot, my liege,--
Fair fall the bones that took the pains for me!--
Compare our faces and be judge yourself.
If old sir Robert did beget us both
And were our father and this son like him,
O old sir Robert, father, on my knee
I give heaven thanks I was not like to thee!

KING JOHN

Why, what a madcap hath heaven lent us here!

QUEEN ELINOR

He hath a trick of Coeur-de-lion's face;
The accent of his tongue affecteth him.
Do you not read some tokens of my son
In the large composition of this man?

KING JOHN

Mine eye hath well examined his parts
And finds them perfect Richard. Sirrah, speak,
What doth move you to claim your brother's land?

BASTARD

Because he hath a half-face, like my father.
With half that face would he have all my land:
A half-faced groat five hundred pound a year!

ROBERT

My gracious liege, when that my father lived,
Your brother did employ my father much,--

BASTARD

Well, sir, by this you cannot get my land:
Your tale must be how he employ'd my mother.

ROBERT

And once dispatch'd him in an embassy
To Germany, there with the emperor
To treat of high affairs touching that time.
The advantage of his absence took the king
And in the mean time sojourn'd at my father's;
Where how he did prevail I shame to speak,
But truth is truth: large lengths of seas and shores
Between my father and my mother lay,
As I have heard my father speak himself,
When this same lusty gentleman was got.
Upon his death-bed he by will bequeath'd
His lands to me, and took it on his death
That this my mother's son was none of his;
And if he were, he came into the world
Full fourteen weeks before the course of time.
Then, good my liege, let me have what is mine,
My father's land, as was my father's will.

KING JOHN

Sirrah, your brother is legitimate;
Your father's wife did after wedlock bear him,
And if she did play false, the fault was hers;
Which fault lies on the hazards of all husbands
That marry wives. Tell me, how if my brother,
Who, as you say, took pains to get this son,
Had of your father claim'd this son for his?
In sooth, good friend, your father might have kept
This calf bred from his cow from all the world;
In sooth he might; then, if he were my brother's,
My brother might not claim him; nor your father,
Being none of his, refuse him: this concludes;
My mother's son did get your father's heir;
Your father's heir must have your father's land.

ROBERT

Shall then my father's will be of no force
To dispossess that child which is not his?

BASTARD

Of no more force to dispossess me, sir,
Than was his will to get me, as I think.

QUEEN ELINOR

Whether hadst thou rather be a Faulconbridge
And like thy brother, to enjoy thy land,
Or the reputed son of Coeur-de-lion,
Lord of thy presence and no land beside?

BASTARD

Madam, an if my brother had my shape,
And I had his, sir Robert's his, like him;
And if my legs were two such riding-rods,
My arms such eel-skins stuff'd, my face so thin
That in mine ear I durst not stick a rose
Lest men should say 'Look, where three-farthings goes!'
And, to his shape, were heir to all this land,
Would I might never stir from off this place,
I would give it every foot to have this face;
I would not be sir Nob in any case.

QUEEN ELINOR

I like thee well: wilt thou forsake thy fortune,
Bequeath thy land to him and follow me?
I am a soldier and now bound to France.

BASTARD

Brother, take you my land, I'll take my chance.
Your face hath got five hundred pound a year,
Yet sell your face for five pence and 'tis dear.
Madam, I'll follow you unto the death.

QUEEN ELINOR

Nay, I would have you go before me thither.

BASTARD

Our country manners give our betters way.

KING JOHN

What is thy name?

BASTARD

Philip, my liege, so is my name begun,
Philip, good old sir Robert's wife's eldest son.

KING JOHN

From henceforth bear his name whose form thou bear'st:
Kneel thou down Philip, but rise more great,
Arise sir Richard and Plantagenet.

BASTARD

Brother by the mother's side, give me your hand:
My father gave me honour, yours gave land.
Now blessed by the hour, by night or day,
When I was got, sir Robert was away!

QUEEN ELINOR

The very spirit of Plantagenet!
I am thy grandam, Richard; call me so.

BASTARD

Madam, by chance but not by truth; what though?
Something about, a little from the right,
In at the window, or else o'er the hatch:
Who dares not stir by day must walk by night,
And have is have, however men do catch:
Near or far off, well won is still well shot,
And I am I, howe'er I was begot.

KING JOHN

Go, Faulconbridge: now hast thou thy desire;
A landless knight makes thee a landed squire.
Come, madam, and come, Richard, we must speed
For France, for France, for it is more than need.

BASTARD

Brother, adieu: good fortune come to thee!
For thou wast got i' the way of honesty.

Exeunt all but BASTARD

A foot of honour better than I was;
But many a many foot of land the worse.
Well, now can I make any Joan a lady.
'Good den, sir Richard!'--'God-a-mercy, fellow!'--
And if his name be George, I'll call him Peter;
For new-made honour doth forget men's names;
'Tis too respective and too sociable
For your conversion. Now your traveller,
He and his toothpick at my worship's mess,
And when my knightly stomach is sufficed,
Why then I suck my teeth and catechise
My picked man of countries: 'My dear sir,'
Thus, leaning on mine elbow, I begin,
'I shall beseech you'--that is question now;
And then comes answer like an Absey book:
'O sir,' says answer, 'at your best command;
At your employment; at your service, sir;'
'No, sir,' says question, 'I, sweet sir, at yours:'
And so, ere answer knows what question would,
Saving in dialogue of compliment,
And talking of the Alps and Apennines,
The Pyrenean and the river Po,
It draws toward supper in conclusion so.
But this is worshipful society
And fits the mounting spirit like myself,
For he is but a bastard to the time
That doth not smack of observation;
And so am I, whether I smack or no;
And not alone in habit and device,
Exterior form, outward accoutrement,
But from the inward motion to deliver
Sweet, sweet, sweet poison for the age's tooth:
Which, though I will not practise to deceive,
Yet, to avoid deceit, I mean to learn;
For it shall strew the footsteps of my rising.
But who comes in such haste in riding-robes?
What woman-post is this? hath she no husband
That will take pains to blow a horn before her?

Enter LADY FAULCONBRIDGE and GURNEY

O me! it is my mother. How now, good lady!
What brings you here to court so hastily?

LADY FAULCONBRIDGE

Where is that slave, thy brother? where is he,
That holds in chase mine honour up and down?

BASTARD

My brother Robert? old sir Robert's son?
Colbrand the giant, that same mighty man?
Is it sir Robert's son that you seek so?

LADY FAULCONBRIDGE

Sir Robert's son! Ay, thou unreverend boy,
Sir Robert's son: why scorn'st thou at sir Robert?
He is sir Robert's son, and so art thou.

BASTARD

James Gurney, wilt thou give us leave awhile?

GURNEY

Good leave, good Philip.

BASTARD

Philip! sparrow: James,
There's toys abroad: anon I'll tell thee more.

Exit GURNEY

Madam, I was not old sir Robert's son:
Sir Robert might have eat his part in me
Upon Good-Friday and ne'er broke his fast:
Sir Robert could do well: marry, to confess,
Could he get me? Sir Robert could not do it:
We know his handiwork: therefore, good mother,
To whom am I beholding for these limbs?
Sir Robert never holp to make this leg.

LADY FAULCONBRIDGE

Hast thou conspired with thy brother too,
That for thine own gain shouldst defend mine honour?
What means this scorn, thou most untoward knave?

BASTARD

Knight, knight, good mother, Basilisco-like.
What! I am dubb'd! I have it on my shoulder.
But, mother, I am not sir Robert's son;
I have disclaim'd sir Robert and my land;
Legitimation, name and all is gone:
Then, good my mother, let me know my father;
Some proper man, I hope: who was it, mother?

LADY FAULCONBRIDGE

Hast thou denied thyself a Faulconbridge?

BASTARD

As faithfully as I deny the devil.

LADY FAULCONBRIDGE

King Richard Coeur-de-lion was thy father:
By long and vehement suit I was seduced
To make room for him in my husband's bed:
Heaven lay not my transgression to my charge!
Thou art the issue of my dear offence,
Which was so strongly urged past my defence.

BASTARD

Now, by this light, were I to get again,
Madam, I would not wish a better father.
Some sins do bear their privilege on earth,
And so doth yours; your fault was not your folly:
Needs must you lay your heart at his dispose,
Subjected tribute to commanding love,
Against whose fury and unmatched force
The aweless lion could not wage the fight,
Nor keep his princely heart from Richard's hand.
He that perforce robs lions of their hearts
May easily win a woman's. Ay, my mother,
With all my heart I thank thee for my father!
Who lives and dares but say thou didst not well
When I was got, I'll send his soul to hell.
Come, lady, I will show thee to my kin;
And they shall say, when Richard me begot,
If thou hadst said him nay, it had been sin:
Who says it was, he lies; I say 'twas not.

Exeunt



János király (Részlet) (Magyar)


Első felvonás

1. szín

Northampton. Trónterem a palotában.
János király, Eleonora királyné, Pembroke, Essex,
Salisbury és mások, Chatillonnal jőnek.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

No szólj, Chatillon, mit kíván a Fransz?

CHATILLON

Frankhon királya, üdvözlés után,
Ezt mondja fölségednek általam,
Az álfönségnek, Angliában itt -

ELEONORA

Ez furcsa kezdet! Álfönség, ugyan?

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Békén, anyám: halljuk, mi a követség.

CHATILLON

Fülöp, franszok királya, néhai
Bátyád, Godofréd kiskorú fia,
Plantagenet Arthur jogán s nevében,
Törvényes ígényt formál ellened
E szép szigethez s tartományihoz,
Mint: Irland, Poitiers, Anjou, Touraine, Maine;
S kivánja, hogy tedd félre kardodat,
Mellyel bitorlod mind e címeket,
S add azt ifjú öcséd, Arthur kezébe,
Urad-királyodéba jog szerint.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Mi lesz belőle, ha ezt megtagadjuk?

CHATILLON

Hát büszke, véres háború daca,
Visszacsikarni a csikart jogot.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Had ellen itt lesz had, dac a dac ellen,
Vér ellen is vér: mondd a Fransznak ezt.

CHATILLON

Vedd hát királyom harcüzenetét,
Mely küldetésem véghatára volt.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Vidd az enyém is; járj Isten hirével.
Légy mint a villám fransz urad szemébe;
Mert míg jelentést tennél, hogy megyek,
Ágyúm dörejje fog hallatszani.
Most menj! Te légy haragunk harsonája
S önpusztulástok gyász előjele.
Kövesse illő kíséret; te láss
Utána, Pembroke. Jó utat, Chatillon.

Chatilion és Pembroke el.

ELEONORA

Nos hát, fiam? nem mindig mondtam-e,
Hogy e kevély Constantia nem pihen,
Míg fel nem gyújtja Frankhont s a világot
Fia jogáért s pártja érdekében?
Ezt elkerülni, s jóra hozni, könnyű
Lett volna eddig szíves alkuval:
Most két királyság fölszerelt hada
Mond benne szörnyü vér-itéletet.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Részünkön a jog, s a birtokba tétel.

ELEONORA

A birtok jóval inkább, mint a jog;
Baj volna másképp mind neked s nekem:
Füledbe öntudatom ezt sugallja;
Rajtunk kivűl csupán az Isten hallja.

Northampton megye sheriffje jő s valamit súg Essexnek.

ESSEX

Királyom, itt a legfurcsább perügy
Van a megyéből s vár itéletedre;
Sohsem hallottam olyat életemben;
Előállítsam a két fél perest?

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Hadd jöjjenek.

Sheriff el.

Monostorink, apátságink fizessék
E had költségeit.

Visszatér a sheriff, meg Faulconbridge Róbert és Filep,
ennek természetes bátyja.

Kik vagytok?

FILEP

Én

Felséged hű jobbágya, e megyéből
Való nemesfi, és ha jól gyanítom,
Faulconbridge Róbert öregebb fia,
Egy bajnoké, kit harcmezőn ütött
Lovaggá Cordelion hős keze.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

S ki vagy te?

RÓBERT

A mondott lovag fia,

És örököse.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Ő az idősebb, s te az örökös?
Nem egy anyától vagytok eszerint.

FILEP

Egytől bizony mi, felséges király,
Sőt egy apától, én úgy gondolom;
Azonban e részt a való iránt
Az Éghez utasítlak, és anyámhoz;
Én kétkedem, mint bárki más fia.

ELEONORA

Píh, durva ember! e kételkedéssel
Anyádat sérted és becsűletét.

FILEP

Én, asszonyom? Nekem nincs rá okom;
Öcsém használja érvül azt, nem én,
Mit ha bepróbál, hát engem kiüt
Éventi ötszáz fontból, legalább.
Ég, óvd anyám erényét s földemet!

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Be jó bolond fickó. - De mért igényli,
Ifjabb létére, a te örököd?

FILEP

Hát tudom én? Csak hogy föld kell neki.
Csúfolt, tudom, hogy zabgyerek vagyok:
Azonban, oly híven fogantam-e
Mint ő, anyámnak lelke rajta, mondok;
De hogy csakoly derékul megfogantam
(Áldás a csontra, mely fáradt velem!),
Vesd össze arcaink, s itélj magad.
Ha vén Sir Róbert nemze engem, őt is,
S rá, mint apára, e fiú ütött:
Ó, vén apám, Sir Róbert, térden, ím,
Adok hálát, hogy arcod nem enyim.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Mi dőre fickót külde ránk az Ég!

ELEONORA

Vonási közt egy Cordelioné;
Rá emlékeztet hanglejtése is.
Nem látsz ez ember vaskos termetén
Fiamból, Cordelionból valót?

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Szemügyre vettem jól vonásait:
Richárd, tökéletes. - Fickó, felelj,
Te mért igényled bátyád földjeit?

FILEP

Azért la, hogy félképű, mint apám,
S e fél pofához kén’ egész vagyon:
Félarcu pénznek ötszáz font bevétel!

RÓBERT

Felséges úr, míg élt szegény apám
Szolgálatával bátyád sokszor élt.

FILEP

De hé, így nem kapod meg birtokom:
Arról beszélj te: hogyan élt anyánkkal.

RÓBERT

S egyszer követnek elküldötte volt,
Hogy a német császárral bizonyos
Fennforgó államügyben értekezzék.
Használta távollétét a király,
S atyám lakásán tölté ez időt;
Hogy boldogult ott, szégyen elbeszélni,
De a való való: sok messzi tenger
Sok part feküdt apám, anyám között
(Apám tulajdon ajkáról tudom),
Midőn e drága úrfi megfogant.
Halálos ágyán, véghagyásul írta
Földjét nekem; s haló hitére mondá,
Hogy nem övé anyámnak e fia;
Másképp tizennégy héttel hamarább
Jött vón világra, mint természetes.
Add meg tehát, felség, mi az enyém,
Apám földjét, apám hagyásaként.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Fickó, a bátyád törvényes fiú:
Apádnak szülte, nász után, neje;
Ha csalfa volt az asszony, lelke rajta;
Ennek kitéve minden férj, ki nőt
Veszen magának. Hátha már az, aki
Szerinted e fiúval fáradott
Visszaperelte volna, mint övét?
Bizony, barátom, a kerek világér
Sem adta vón apád üszője borját;
Bizony, nem az. Hahát bátyám, fia
Levén, nem kívánhatta jog szerint:
Apádnak sincs kizárni őt joga,
Bár nem övé is. Egy szó annyi mint száz:
Apád utódot nyert anyám fiától:
S apád utódja nyerje birtokát.

RÓBERT

Így hát nem áll atyám végrendelése,
Amely kizárja ezt a nem-fiát?

FILEP

Cseppel sem áll jobban kizárni, hé,
Mint rajta állott engem nemzeni.

ELEONORA

Faulconbridge lenni volna kedved inkább,
S úgy, mint öcséd, élvezni birtokod,
Vagy Cordelion hírneves fia,
Ura magadnak, s hozzá semmi földnek?

FILEP

Ha ő bírná külsőmet, asszonyom,
S én az övét, Sir Róbert képe mását;
Ha lábam oly két vesszőparipa,
Karom két oly tömött ángolnabőr,
S oly vézna orcám volna, mint neki,
Úgy hogy fülemhez egy rózsát se mernék
Feltűzni, félve, rám kiáltanak:
»Ni, a háromfilléres hol megyen!«
Örökleném ez országot vele,
Ne mozduljak ki e helyből soha,
Ha egy talpallat kéne, s az a kép:
Sir Róbert nem maradnék semmiképp.

ELEONORA

Tetszel nekem. Hagyd néki birtokod,
Hagyd rája földed, és jer énvelem:
Harcos vagyok, megyünk a franciára.

FILEP

Öcsém, tiéd a föld; enyém a kocka.
Képed ma ötszáz font hasznot szerez:
Áruld öt pénzen, úgy is drága lesz.
Követlek a halálba, asszonyom.

ELEONORA

De már előttem menj inkább oda.

FILEP

Minálunk a feljebbvalót szokás
Elől bocsátni.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Hogy hínak?

FILEP

Filep;

Filep vagyok, mert úgy keresztelének;
Idősb fia vén Sir Róbert nejének.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Viseld ezentúl annak a nevét,
Kinek alakját viseled. (Lovaggá üti)
Térdelj le mint Filep, s kelj mint nagyobb:
Állj fel mint Sir Richárd Plantagenet.

RICHÁRD

Öcsém anyárul, addsza jobbodat:
Atyám díszt, a tied csak földet ad. -
Áldott az a nap, óra, perc, melyen
Fogantam s Róbert úr nem volt jelen.

ELEONORA

Igaz Plantagenet szellem! - Richárd,
Híj nagyanyádnak, az vagyok.

RICHÁRD

Esetleg,

Madám; nem jog szerint: de mit tesz az?
Így, vagy amúgy - kissé bal útakon;
Ha nem az ajtón, hát az ablakon;
Éjszaka jár, ki nappal járni nem mer;
S van a van, bárhogy jut hozzá az ember.
Távol, közel - csak célt lőj - egyre mén:
S én én vagyok, akárhogy lettem én.

JÁNOS KIRÁLY

Faulconbridge, elmehetsz: egy földtelen
Lovag, ím, földes apróddá teszen. -
Jerünk, anyám; Richárd, jer: nincs idő;
A franszra, franszra! Útunk siető.

RICHÁRD

Öcsém, szerencse kísérjen, habár
Te a becsűletben fogantatál.

Mind el, Richárdon kívül.

Egy lábnyi ranggal több ma, mint valék,
De sok, sok lábnyi földdel kevesebb;
Most bármi Pannát úrnővé tehetnék.
»Jó reggelt, Sir Richárd.« - »Szervusz, fiú!«
S ha Péter volt, Pálnak szólítom őt,
Mert újdonsült rang a nevet felejti:
Ily fordulatkor, emlékezni rá
Komázás lenne s túlzott figyelem.
Nos, útazónk - ő, s fogpiszkája itt űl
»Mélt’sám« ebédjén, és midőn lovag
Gyomrom betelt, hát szívom a fogam,
S kicsípett emberkémet vallatom
Külországok felől: »Ah! kedves úr« -
Környékre dűlve így kezdek belé,
»Szabadna kérnem« - Ez kérdés vala;
Most jő a válasz kis-káté gyanánt:
»Szolgálatára« úgymond »kedves úr!
Tessék, uram! parancsoljon velem.«
»Nem!« szól a kérdés - »a parancs öné«;
S így, mielőtt tudná a felelet,
Mi hát a kérdés, puszta bók között
Foly Alpesről, Apenninről a szó,
Beléjön a Pyréne és a Pó,
És ily modorban eltart estvelig.
De hát ez a »jó társaság«, s nagyon kell
Kapaszkodó szellemnek, mint magam.
Mert az korának korcsszülötte csak,
Kin meg nem érzik e finomkodás
(Érzik, nem érzik: én már az vagyok)
Nemcsak szokásán, módján, külsején,
Egész valóján és viseletében:
De, hogy bel ösztönből is tudjon adni
A kor fogára édes, édes mérget;
Mit én is, bár nem szándokom vele
Rászedni mást, igyekszem eltanulni,
Csak hogy kerüljem a rászedetést;
Mert ez jövőm útját egyengeti. -
Hanem ki nyargal itt, lovagruhában?
Mi hölgyfutár ez? Nincsen férje, hogy
Fúná előtte a tülök-szarut?

Faulconbridge-né meg Gurney Jakab jő.

Ó, jéh! anyám ez. - Nos, jó asszony’ám?
Mi jóba fárad ily lélek-szakadva?

FAULCONBRIDGE-NÉ

Hol a gazember? hol öcséd, aki
Becsűletem hurcolja fel s alá?

RICHÁRD

Róbert öcsém? vén Sir Róbert fia?
Colbrand, az órjás? a hatalmas ember?
A Sir Róbert fiát tetszik keresni?

FAULCONBRIDGE-NÉ

Róbert fiát! Azt hát, te rossz gyerek.
A Sir Róbert fiát. Mit gúnyolódol?
Ő Sir Róbert fia, s az vagy te is.

RICHÁRD

Hagynál magunkra egy kissé, Jakab.

GURNEY

Jó, jó, Filep.

RICHÁRD

Filep? csirip! Jakab,

Nem addig a! Majd mondok többet is.

Gurney el.

Én nem vagyok Sir Róberté, anyám:
Róbert úr, ami bennem része van,
Megehette volna, bőjtszegés nekűl,
Nagypénteken is. Róbert úr, ha lelkét
Kitette volna - csak szóljunk valót -
Bírt volna engem nemzeni? Soha! -
Ismerjük a müvét. - No hát, anyám,
Kinek köszönjem én e tagokat?
Róbert ezekhez társ nem volt soha.

FAULCONBRIDGE-NÉ

Hát már öcsédhez esküvél te is,
Ki védni tartoznál becsűletem
Önhasznodért is? Mit csufolkodol,
Te mosdatlan szájú cseléd!

RICHÁRD

Lovag, anyám, lovag! - mint Basilisco.
Azzá ütöttek: itt van vállamon.
De Róbert úré nem vagyok, anyám;
Lemondtam Róbert úrról, birtokostul;
Törvényes állás, név - mind, mind oda.
No hát, anyácskám, mondd apám nevét:
Csinos legény volt, úgy-e? ki, anyám?

FAULCONBRIDGE-NÉ

Hát megtagadtad Faulconbridge neved?

RICHÁRD

Teljes szivemből, mint az ördögöt.

FAULCONBRIDGE-NÉ

Oroszlánszívü Richárd volt atyád.
Megejte hosszu és hév ostroma,
Hogy férjem ágyán helyt adék neki. -
Az Ég ne rója bűnül tévedésem!
E drága vétség gyümölcse te lől:
Nem volt menekvés annyi csáb elől.

RICHÁRD

No, Isten engem! ha ma kéne újra
Foganni, sem kivánnék jobb apát.
Némely bűn e földön kivételes:
Az a tiéd: bűn volt, de nem bolondság.
Hogy is ne adtad volna szíved annak
Kényére, mint parancsoló szerelme
Jobbágy adóját, akinek dühe
S hatalma ellen még a félhetetlen
Oroszlán sem bírt harcot áltani
S megóni tőle fejdelmi szivét!
Az, ki oroszlánszíveket rabol,
Egy asszonyét ne? - Igenis, anyám,
Teljes szivemből köszönöm atyámat!
Ki élve gáncsot lél e tetteden,
Annak lelkét pokolba kergetem.
Most jer, anyám, ismerd meg a családot;
Azt mondja, meglásd, az lett volna bűn,
Ha Richárdot »nem« szóval elbocsátod;
Ki bűnnek mondja, hazud, egyszerűn.

Elmennek.



KiadóEurópa
Az idézet forrásaWilliam Shakespeare: János király

minimap