Ez az oldal sütiket használ

A portál felületén sütiket (cookies) használ, vagyis a rendszer adatokat tárol az Ön böngészőjében. A sütik személyek azonosítására nem alkalmasak, szolgáltatásaink biztosításához szükségesek. Az oldal használatával Ön beleegyezik a sütik használatába.

Hírek

Shakespeare, William: Jules César (Julius Caesar (Detail) Francia nyelven)

Shakespeare, William portréja

Julius Caesar (Detail) (Angol)


ACT I

SCENE I. Rome. A street.

Enter FLAVIUS, MARULLUS, and certain Commoners

FLAVIUS

Hence! home, you idle creatures get you home:
Is this a holiday? what! know you not,
Being mechanical, you ought not walk
Upon a labouring day without the sign
Of your profession? Speak, what trade art thou?

First Commoner

Why, sir, a carpenter.

MARULLUS

Where is thy leather apron and thy rule?
What dost thou with thy best apparel on?
You, sir, what trade are you?

Second Commoner

Truly, sir, in respect of a fine workman, I am but,
as you would say, a cobbler.

MARULLUS

But what trade art thou? answer me directly.

Second Commoner

A trade, sir, that, I hope, I may use with a safe
conscience; which is, indeed, sir, a mender of bad soles.

MARULLUS

What trade, thou knave? thou naughty knave, what trade?

Second Commoner

Nay, I beseech you, sir, be not out with me: yet,
if you be out, sir, I can mend you.

MARULLUS

What meanest thou by that? mend me, thou saucy fellow!

Second Commoner

Why, sir, cobble you.

FLAVIUS

Thou art a cobbler, art thou?

Second Commoner

Truly, sir, all that I live by is with the awl: I
meddle with no tradesman's matters, nor women's
matters, but with awl. I am, indeed, sir, a surgeon
to old shoes; when they are in great danger, I
recover them. As proper men as ever trod upon
neat's leather have gone upon my handiwork.

FLAVIUS

But wherefore art not in thy shop today?
Why dost thou lead these men about the streets?

Second Commoner

Truly, sir, to wear out their shoes, to get myself
into more work. But, indeed, sir, we make holiday,
to see Caesar and to rejoice in his triumph.

MARULLUS

Wherefore rejoice? What conquest brings he home?
What tributaries follow him to Rome,
To grace in captive bonds his chariot-wheels?
You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things!
O you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome,
Knew you not Pompey? Many a time and oft
Have you climb'd up to walls and battlements,
To towers and windows, yea, to chimney-tops,
Your infants in your arms, and there have sat
The livelong day, with patient expectation,
To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome:
And when you saw his chariot but appear,
Have you not made an universal shout,
That Tiber trembled underneath her banks,
To hear the replication of your sounds
Made in her concave shores?
And do you now put on your best attire?
And do you now cull out a holiday?
And do you now strew flowers in his way
That comes in triumph over Pompey's blood? Be gone!
Run to your houses, fall upon your knees,
Pray to the gods to intermit the plague
That needs must light on this ingratitude.

FLAVIUS

Go, go, good countrymen, and, for this fault,
Assemble all the poor men of your sort;
Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears
Into the channel, till the lowest stream
Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.

Exeunt all the Commoners

See whether their basest metal be not moved;
They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness.
Go you down that way towards the Capitol;

This way will I

disrobe the images,
If you do find them deck'd with ceremonies.

MARULLUS

May we do so?
You know it is the feast of Lupercal.

FLAVIUS

It is no matter; let no images
Be hung with Caesar's trophies. I'll about,
And drive away the vulgar from the streets:
So do you too, where you perceive them thick.
These growing feathers pluck'd from Caesar's wing
Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,
Who else would soar above the view of men
And keep us all in servile fearfulness.

Exeunt

SCENE II. A public place.

Flourish. Enter CAESAR; ANTONY, for the course; CALPURNIA, PORTIA, DECIUS BRUTUS, CICERO, BRUTUS, CASSIUS, and CASCA; a great crowd following, among them a Soothsayer

CAESAR

Calpurnia!

CASCA

Peace, ho! Caesar speaks.

CAESAR

Calpurnia!

CALPURNIA

Here, my lord.

CAESAR

Stand you directly in Antonius' way,
When he doth run his course. Antonius!

ANTONY

Caesar, my lord?

CAESAR

Forget not, in your speed, Antonius,
To touch Calpurnia; for our elders say,
The barren, touched in this holy chase,
Shake off their sterile curse.

ANTONY

I shall remember:
When Caesar says 'do this,' it is perform'd.

CAESAR

Set on; and leave no ceremony out.

Flourish

Soothsayer

Caesar!

CAESAR

Ha! who calls?

CASCA

Bid every noise be still: peace yet again!

CAESAR

Who is it in the press that calls on me?
I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music,
Cry 'Caesar!' Speak; Caesar is turn'd to hear.

Soothsayer

Beware the ides of March.

CAESAR

What man is that?

BRUTUS

A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.

CAESAR

Set him before me; let me see his face.

CASSIUS

Fellow, come from the throng; look upon Caesar.

CAESAR

What say'st thou to me now? speak once again.

Soothsayer

Beware the ides of March.

CAESAR

He is a dreamer; let us leave him: pass.

Sennet. Exeunt all except BRUTUS and CASSIUS

CASSIUS

Will you go see the order of the course?

BRUTUS

Not I.

CASSIUS

I pray you, do.

BRUTUS

I am not gamesome: I do lack some part
Of that quick spirit that is in Antony.
Let me not hinder, Cassius, your desires;
I'll leave you.

CASSIUS

Brutus, I do observe you now of late:
I have not from your eyes that gentleness
And show of love as I was wont to have:
You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
Over your friend that loves you.

BRUTUS

Cassius,
Be not deceived: if I have veil'd my look,
I turn the trouble of my countenance
Merely upon myself. Vexed I am
Of late with passions of some difference,
Conceptions only proper to myself,
Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors;
But let not therefore my good friends be grieved--
Among which number, Cassius, be you one--
Nor construe any further my neglect,
Than that poor Brutus, with himself at war,
Forgets the shows of love to other men.

CASSIUS

Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion;
By means whereof this breast of mine hath buried
Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations.
Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face?

BRUTUS

No, Cassius; for the eye sees not itself,
But by reflection, by some other things.

CASSIUS

'Tis just:
And it is very much lamented, Brutus,
That you have no such mirrors as will turn
Your hidden worthiness into your eye,
That you might see your shadow. I have heard,
Where many of the best respect in Rome,
Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus
And groaning underneath this age's yoke,
Have wish'd that noble Brutus had his eyes.

BRUTUS

Into what dangers would you lead me, Cassius,
That you would have me seek into myself
For that which is not in me?

CASSIUS

Therefore, good Brutus, be prepared to hear:
And since you know you cannot see yourself
So well as by reflection, I, your glass,
Will modestly discover to yourself
That of yourself which you yet know not of.
And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus:
Were I a common laugher, or did use
To stale with ordinary oaths my love
To every new protester; if you know
That I do fawn on men and hug them hard
And after scandal them, or if you know
That I profess myself in banqueting
To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.

Flourish, and shout

BRUTUS

What means this shouting? I do fear, the people
Choose Caesar for their king.

CASSIUS

Ay, do you fear it?
Then must I think you would not have it so.

BRUTUS

I would not, Cassius; yet I love him well.
But wherefore do you hold me here so long?
What is it that you would impart to me?
If it be aught toward the general good,
Set honour in one eye and death i' the other,
And I will look on both indifferently,
For let the gods so speed me as I love
The name of honour more than I fear death.

CASSIUS

I know that virtue to be in you, Brutus,
As well as I do know your outward favour.
Well, honour is the subject of my story.
I cannot tell what you and other men
Think of this life; but, for my single self,
I had as lief not be as live to be
In awe of such a thing as I myself.
I was born free as Caesar; so were you:
We both have fed as well, and we can both
Endure the winter's cold as well as he:
For once, upon a raw and gusty day,
The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
Caesar said to me 'Darest thou, Cassius, now
Leap in with me into this angry flood,
And swim to yonder point?' Upon the word,
Accoutred as I was, I plunged in
And bade him follow; so indeed he did.
The torrent roar'd, and we did buffet it
With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
And stemming it with hearts of controversy;
But ere we could arrive the point proposed,
Caesar cried 'Help me, Cassius, or I sink!'
I, as Aeneas, our great ancestor,
Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder
The old Anchises bear, so from the waves of Tiber
Did I the tired Caesar. And this man
Is now become a god, and Cassius is
A wretched creature and must bend his body,
If Caesar carelessly but nod on him.
He had a fever when he was in Spain,
And when the fit was on him, I did mark
How he did shake: 'tis true, this god did shake;
His coward lips did from their colour fly,
And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world
Did lose his lustre: I did hear him groan:
Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans
Mark him and write his speeches in their books,
Alas, it cried 'Give me some drink, Titinius,'
As a sick girl. Ye gods, it doth amaze me
A man of such a feeble temper should
So get the start of the majestic world
And bear the palm alone.

Shout. Flourish

BRUTUS

Another general shout!
I do believe that these applauses are
For some new honours that are heap'd on Caesar.

CASSIUS

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs and peep about
To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
Men at some time are masters of their fates:
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?
Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
Write them together, yours is as fair a name;
Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;
Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,
Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
Now, in the names of all the gods at once,
Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,
That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
When went there by an age, since the great flood,
But it was famed with more than with one man?
When could they say till now, that talk'd of Rome,
That her wide walls encompass'd but one man?
Now is it Rome indeed and room enough,
When there is in it but one only man.
O, you and I have heard our fathers say,
There was a Brutus once that would have brook'd
The eternal devil to keep his state in Rome
As easily as a king.

BRUTUS

That you do love me, I am nothing jealous;
What you would work me to, I have some aim:
How I have thought of this and of these times,
I shall recount hereafter; for this present,
I would not, so with love I might entreat you,
Be any further moved. What you have said
I will consider; what you have to say
I will with patience hear, and find a time
Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
Till then, my noble friend, chew upon this:
Brutus had rather be a villager
Than to repute himself a son of Rome
Under these hard conditions as this time
Is like to lay upon us.

CASSIUS

I am glad that my weak words
Have struck but thus much show of fire from Brutus.

BRUTUS

The games are done and Caesar is returning.

CASSIUS

As they pass by, pluck Casca by the sleeve;
And he will, after his sour fashion, tell you
What hath proceeded worthy note to-day.

Re-enter CAESAR and his Train

BRUTUS

I will do so. But, look you, Cassius,
The angry spot doth glow on Caesar's brow,
And all the rest look like a chidden train:
Calpurnia's cheek is pale; and Cicero
Looks with such ferret and such fiery eyes
As we have seen him in the Capitol,
Being cross'd in conference by some senators.

CASSIUS

Casca will tell us what the matter is.

CAESAR

Antonius!

ANTONY

Caesar?

CAESAR

Let me have men about me that are fat;
Sleek-headed men and such as sleep o' nights:
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look;
He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.

ANTONY

Fear him not, Caesar; he's not dangerous;
He is a noble Roman and well given.

CAESAR

Would he were fatter! But I fear him not:
Yet if my name were liable to fear,
I do not know the man I should avoid
So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much;
He is a great observer and he looks
Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays,
As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music;
Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort
As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit
That could be moved to smile at any thing.
Such men as he be never at heart's ease
Whiles they behold a greater than themselves,
And therefore are they very dangerous.
I rather tell thee what is to be fear'd
Than what I fear; for always I am Caesar.
Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf,
And tell me truly what thou think'st of him.

Sennet. Exeunt CAESAR and all his Train, but CASCA

CASCA

You pull'd me by the cloak; would you speak with me?

BRUTUS

Ay, Casca; tell us what hath chanced to-day,
That Caesar looks so sad.

CASCA

Why, you were with him, were you not?

BRUTUS

I should not then ask Casca what had chanced.

CASCA

Why, there was a crown offered him: and being
offered him, he put it by with the back of his hand,
thus; and then the people fell a-shouting.

BRUTUS

What was the second noise for?

CASCA

Why, for that too.

CASSIUS

They shouted thrice: what was the last cry for?

CASCA

Why, for that too.

BRUTUS

Was the crown offered him thrice?

CASCA

Ay, marry, was't, and he put it by thrice, every
time gentler than other, and at every putting-by
mine honest neighbours shouted.

CASSIUS

Who offered him the crown?

CASCA

Why, Antony.

BRUTUS

Tell us the manner of it, gentle Casca.

CASCA

I can as well be hanged as tell the manner of it:
it was mere foolery; I did not mark it. I saw Mark
Antony offer him a crown;--yet 'twas not a crown
neither, 'twas one of these coronets;--and, as I told
you, he put it by once: but, for all that, to my
thinking, he would fain have had it. Then he
offered it to him again; then he put it by again:
but, to my thinking, he was very loath to lay his
fingers off it. And then he offered it the third
time; he put it the third time by: and still as he
refused it, the rabblement hooted and clapped their
chapped hands and threw up their sweaty night-caps
and uttered such a deal of stinking breath because
Caesar refused the crown that it had almost choked
Caesar; for he swounded and fell down at it: and
for mine own part, I durst not laugh, for fear of
opening my lips and receiving the bad air.

CASSIUS

But, soft, I pray you: what, did Caesar swound?

CASCA

He fell down in the market-place, and foamed at
mouth, and was speechless.

BRUTUS

'Tis very like: he hath the failing sickness.

CASSIUS

No, Caesar hath it not; but you and I,
And honest Casca, we have the falling sickness.

CASCA

I know not what you mean by that; but, I am sure,
Caesar fell down. If the tag-rag people did not
clap him and hiss him, according as he pleased and
displeased them, as they use to do the players in
the theatre, I am no true man.

BRUTUS

What said he when he came unto himself?

CASCA

Marry, before he fell down, when he perceived the
common herd was glad he refused the crown, he
plucked me ope his doublet and offered them his
throat to cut. An I had been a man of any
occupation, if I would not have taken him at a word,
I would I might go to hell among the rogues. And so
he fell. When he came to himself again, he said,
If he had done or said any thing amiss, he desired
their worships to think it was his infirmity. Three
or four wenches, where I stood, cried 'Alas, good
soul!' and forgave him with all their hearts: but
there's no heed to be taken of them; if Caesar had
stabbed their mothers, they would have done no less.

BRUTUS

And after that, he came, thus sad, away?

CASCA

Ay.

CASSIUS

Did Cicero say any thing?

CASCA

Ay, he spoke Greek.

CASSIUS

To what effect?

CASCA

Nay, an I tell you that, Ill ne'er look you i' the
face again: but those that understood him smiled at
one another and shook their heads; but, for mine own
part, it was Greek to me. I could tell you more
news too: Marullus and Flavius, for pulling scarfs
off Caesar's images, are put to silence. Fare you
well. There was more foolery yet, if I could
remember it.

CASSIUS

Will you sup with me to-night, Casca?

CASCA

No, I am promised forth.

CASSIUS

Will you dine with me to-morrow?

CASCA

Ay, if I be alive and your mind hold and your dinner
worth the eating.

CASSIUS

Good: I will expect you.

CASCA

Do so. Farewell, both.

Exit

BRUTUS

What a blunt fellow is this grown to be!
He was quick mettle when he went to school.

CASSIUS

So is he now in execution
Of any bold or noble enterprise,
However he puts on this tardy form.
This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
Which gives men stomach to digest his words
With better appetite.

BRUTUS

And so it is. For this time I will leave you:
To-morrow, if you please to speak with me,
I will come home to you; or, if you will,
Come home to me, and I will wait for you.

CASSIUS

I will do so: till then, think of the world.

Exit BRUTUS

Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see,
Thy honourable metal may be wrought
From that it is disposed: therefore it is meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes;
For who so firm that cannot be seduced?
Caesar doth bear me hard; but he loves Brutus:
If I were Brutus now and he were Cassius,
He should not humour me. I will this night,
In several hands, in at his windows throw,
As if they came from several citizens,
Writings all tending to the great opinion
That Rome holds of his name; wherein obscurely
Caesar's ambition shall be glanced at:
And after this let Caesar seat him sure;
For we will shake him, or worse days endure.

Exit




Jules César (Francia)

ACTE PREMIER
SCÈNE I

Rome.--Une rue.
Entrent_ FLAVIUS ET MARULLUS, _et une multitude de citoyens des basses
Classes.


FLAVIUS.--Hors d'ici, rentrez, fainéans; rentrez chez vous. Est-ce
aujourd'hui fête? Quoi! ne savez-vous pas que vous autres artisans vous
ne devez circuler dans les rues les jours ouvrables qu'avec les signes
de votre profession?--Parle, quel est ton métier?

PREMIER CITOYEN.--Moi, monsieur? charpentier.

MARULLUS.--Où sont ton tablier de cuir et ta règle? Que fais-tu ici avec
ton habit des jours de fêtes?--Et vous, s'il vous plaît, quel est votre
métier?

SECOND CITOYEN.--Pour dire vrai, monsieur, en fait d'ouvrage fin, je ne
suis pas autre chose que comme qui dirait un savetier.

MARULLUS.--Mais quel est ton métier? Réponds-moi tout de suite.

SECOND CITOYEN.--Un métier, monsieur, que je crois pouvoir faire en
sûreté de conscience: je remets en état les âmes qui ne valent rien.

MARULLUS.--Quel est ton métier, maraud, mauvais drôle, ton métier?

SECOND CITOYEN.--Monsieur, je vous en prie, que je ne vous fasse pas
ainsi sortir de votre caractère. Cependant, si vous en sortiez par
quelque bout, monsieur, je pourrais vous remettre en état.

MARULLUS.--Qu'entends-tu par là? Me remettre en état, insolent?

SECOND CITOYEN.--Sans difficulté, monsieur, vous _resaveter._

MARULLUS.--Tu es donc savetier? L'es-tu?

SECOND CITOYEN.--Bien vrai, monsieur, je n'ai pour vivre que mon alêne.
Je n'entre pas, moi, dans les affaires de commerce, dans les affaires de
femmes; je n'entre qu'avec mon alêne Au fait, monsieur, je suis un
chirurgien de vieux souliers: quand ils sont presque perdus, je les
recouvre ; et on a vu bien des gens, je dis des meilleurs qui aient
jamais marché sur peau de bête, faire leur chemin sur de l'ouvrage de ma
façon.

FLAVIUS.--Mais pourquoi n'es-tu pas dans ta boutique aujourd'hui?
pourquoi mènes-tu tous ces gens-là courir les rues?

SECOND CITOYEN.--Vraiment, monsieur, pour user leurs souliers, afin de
me procurer plus d'ouvrage.--Mais sérieusement, monsieur, nous nous
sommes mis en fête pour voir César, et nous réjouir de son triomphe.

MARULLUS.--Vous réjouir! et de quoi? quelles conquêtes vient-il vous
rapporter? Quels nouveaux tributaires le suivent à Rome pour orner,
enchaînés, les roues de son char? Bûches, pierres que vous êtes, vous
êtes pires que les choses insensibles! O coeurs durs, cruels enfants
de Rome, n'avez-vous point connu Pompée? Bien des fois, bien souvent,
n'êtes-vous pas montés sur les murailles et les créneaux, sur les
fenêtres et les tours, jusque sur le haut des cheminées, vos enfants
dans vos bras; et là, patiemment assis, n'attendiez-vous pas tout le
long du jour pour voir le grand Pompée traverser les rues de Rome; et
de si loin que vous voyiez paraître son char, le cri universel de vos
acclamations ne faisait-il pas trembler le Tibre au plus profond de
son lit, de l'écho de vos voix répété sous ses rivages caverneux? Et
aujourd'hui vous prenez vos plus beaux vêtements, et vous choisissez
ce jour pour un jour de fête! et aujourd'hui vous semez de fleurs
le passage de l'homme qui vient à vous triomphant du sang de
Pompée!.--Allez-vous-en.--Courez à vos maisons, tombez à genoux,
priez les dieux de suspendre l'inévitable fléau près d'éclater sur cette
ingratitude.

FLAVIUS.--Allez, allez, bons compatriotes; et pour expier votre faute,
assemblez tous les pauvres gens de votre sorte, conduisez-les au bord du
Tibre; et là, pleurez dans son canal tout ce que vous avez de larmes,
jusqu'à ce que ses eaux, à l'endroit le plus enfoncé de son cours,
caressent le point le plus élevé de son rivage. _(Les citoyens
sortent.)_ Voyez si cette matière grossière n'a pas été émue: ils
disparaissent la langue enchaînée par le sentiment de leur tort.--Vous,
descendez cette rue qui mène au Capitole; moi, je vais suivre ce chemin.
Dépouillez les statues si vous les trouvez parées d'ornements de fête.

MARULLUS.--Le pouvons-nous? Vous savez que c'est aujourd'hui la fête des
Lupercales.

FLAVIUS.--N'importe, ne souffrons pas qu'aucune statue porte les
trophées de César. Je vais parcourir ces quartiers et chasser
le peuple des rues; faites-en de même partout où vous le trouverez
attroupé. Ces plumes naissantes arrachées de l'aile de César ne le
laisseront voler qu'à la hauteur ordinaire; autrement dans son essor, il
s'élèverait trop haut pour être vu des hommes, et nous tiendrait tous
dans un servile effroi.

(Ils sortent.)


SCÈNE II

Toujours à Rome.--Une place publique.
Entrent en procession et avec la musique_ CÉSAR, ANTOINE _préparé
pour la course;_ CALPHURNIA, PORCIA, DÉCIUS, CICÉRON, BRUTUS, CASSIUS,
CASCA.--Ils sont suivis d'une grande multitude dans laquelle se trouve
un devin.


CÉSAR.--Calphurnia!

CASCA.--Holà! silence! César parle.

(La musique cesse.)

CÉSAR.--Calphurnia!

CALPHURNIA.--Me voici, mon seigneur.

CÉSAR.--Ayez soin de vous tenir sur le passage d'Antoine, quand il
courra.--Antoine!

ANTOINE.--César, mon seigneur.

CÉSAR.--N'oubliez pas en courant, Antoine, de toucher Calphurnia; car
nos anciens disent que les femmes infécondes, en se faisant toucher dans
cette sainte course, secouent la malédiction qui les rendait stériles.

ANTOINE.--Je m'en souviendrai. Quand César dit: _Faites cela_, cela est
fait.

CÉSAR.--Partez, et n'omettez aucune cérémonie.

(Musique.)

LE DEVIN.--César!

CÉSAR.--Ha! qui m'appelle?

CASCA, _s'adressant à ceux qui l'environnent._--Commandez que tout bruit
cesse. Encore une fois, silence!

(La musique s'arrête.)

CÉSAR.--Qui est-ce, dans la foule, qui m'appelle ainsi? J'entends une
voix, plus perçante que tous les instruments de musique crier _César!_
Parle, César se tourne pour entendre.

LE DEVIN.--Prends garde aux ides de mars.

CÉSAR.--Quel est cet homme?

BRUTUS.--Un devin qui vous avertit de prendre garde aux ides de mars.

CÉSAR.--Amenez-le devant moi, que je voie son visage.

CASCA.--Mon ami, sors de la foule, regarde César.

CÉSAR.--Qu'as-tu à me dire maintenant? Répète encore.

LE DEVIN.--Prends garde aux ides de mars.

CÉSAR.--C'est un visionnaire; laissons-le, passons.

(Les musiciens exécutent un morceau.)

(Tous sortent, excepté Brutus et Cassius.)

CASSIUS.--Irez-vous voir l'ordre de la course?

BRUTUS.--Moi? non.

CASSIUS.--Je vous en prie, allez-y.

BRUTUS.--Je ne suis point un homme de divertissements; je n'ai pas tout
à fait la vivacité d'Antoine. Que je ne vous empêche pas, Cassius, de
suivre votre intention; je vais vous laisser.

CASSIUS.--Brutus, je vous observe depuis quelque temps: je ne reçois
plus de vos yeux ces regards de douceur, ces signes d'affection que
j'avais coutume d'en recevoir. Vous tenez envers votre ami, qui vous
aime, une conduite trop froide et trop peu cordiale.

BRUTUS.--Ne vous y trompez point, Cassius: si mon regard s'est voilé,
ce trouble de mon maintien ne porte que sur moi-même. Je suis tourmenté
depuis quelque temps de sentiments qui se contrarient, d'idées qui
ne concernent que moi, et donnent peut-être quelque bizarrerie à mes
manières: mais que mes bons amis, au nombre desquels je vous compte,
Cassius, n'en soient donc pas affligés, et ne voient rien de plus dans
cette négligence, sinon que ce pauvre Brutus, en guerre avec lui-même,
oublie de donner aux autres des témoignages de son amitié.

Vous vous êtes trompé: quelques ennuis secrets,
Des chagrins peu connus, ont changé mon visage;
Ils me regardent seul et non pas mes amis.
Non, n'imaginez point que Brutus vous néglige:
Plaignez plutôt Brutus en guerre avec lui-même:
J'ai l'air indifférent, mais mon coeur ne l'est pas.]

CASSIUS.--Alors je me suis bien trompé, Brutus, sur le sujet de vos
peines, et cela m'a fait ensevelir dans mon sein des pensées d'un haut
prix, d'honorables méditations. Dites-moi, digne Brutus, pouvez-vous
voir votre propre visage?

BRUTUS.--Non, Cassius; car l'oeil ne peut se voir lui-même, si ce n'est
par réflexion, au moyen de quelque autre objet.

CASSIUS.--Cela est vrai, et l'on déplore beaucoup, Brutus, que vous
n'ayez pas de miroirs qui puissent réfléchir à vos yeux votre mérite
caché pour vous, qui vous fassent voir votre image. J'ai entendu
plusieurs des citoyens les plus considérés de Rome (sauf l'immortel
César) parler de Brutus; et, gémissant sous le joug qui opprime notre
génération, ils souhaitaient que le noble Brutus fît usage de ses yeux.

BRUTUS.--Dans quels périls prétendez-vous m'entraîner, Cassius, en me
pressant de chercher en moi-même ce qui n'y est pas.

CASSIUS.--Brutus, préparez-vous à m'écouter; et puisque vous savez que
vous ne pouvez pas vous voir vous-même aussi bien que par la réflexion,
moi, votre miroir, je vous découvrirai modestement les parties de
vous-même que vous ne connaissez pas encore. Et ne vous méfiez pas de
moi, excellent Brutus: si je suis un railleur de profession, si j'ai
coutume de faire avec les serments ordinaires, étalage de mon amitié à
tous ceux qui viennent me protester de la leur, si vous savez que
je courtise les hommes et les étouffe de caresses pour les déchirer
ensuite, ou que dans la chaleur des festins je fais des déclarations
d'amitié à toute la salle, alors tenez-moi pour dangereux.

(On entend des trompettes et une acclamation.)

BRUTUS.--Qu'annonce cette acclamation? Je crains que ce peuple n'adopte
César pour roi.

CASSIUS.--Oui? le craignez-vous?--Je dois donc penser que vous ne
voudriez pas qu'il le fût.

BRUTUS.--Je ne le voudrais pas, Cassius; cependant je l'aime
beaucoup.--Mais pourquoi me retenez-vous si longtemps? de quoi
désirez-vous me faire part? Si c'est quelque chose qui tende au
bien public, placez devant mes yeux l'honneur d'un côté, la mort de
l'autre, et je les regarderai tous deux indifféremment; car je
demande aux dieux de m'être aussi propices, qu'il est vrai que j'aime ce
qui s'appelle honneur plus que je ne crains la mort.

CASSIUS.--Je vous connais cette vertu, Brutus, tout aussi bien que je
connais le charme de vos manières. Eh bien! l'honneur est le sujet de ce
que j'ai à vous exposer. Je ne puis dire ce que vous et d'autres hommes
pensent de cette vie; mais pour moi, j'aimerais autant ne pas être que
de vivre dans la crainte et le respect devant un être semblable à moi.
Je suis né libre comme César; vous aussi; nous avons tous deux profité
de même; tous deux nous pouvons aussi bien que lui soutenir le froid de
l'hiver.--Dans un jour brumeux et orageux où le Tibre agité s'irritait
contre ses rivages, César me dit: «Oses-tu, Cassius, t'élancer avec moi
dans ce courant furieux, et nager jusque là-bas?»--À ce seul mot, vêtu
comme j'étais, je plongeai dans le fleuve, en le sommant de me suivre.
En effet, il me suivit: le torrent rugissait; nous le battions de nos
muscles nerveux, rejetant ses eaux des deux côtés et coupant le courant
d'un coeur animé par la dispute. Mais avant que nous eussions atteint
le but marqué, César s'écrie: «Secours-moi, Cassius, ou je péris.» Moi,
comme Énée notre grand ancêtre emporta sur son épaule le vieux Anchise
hors des flammes de Troie, j'emportai hors des vagues du Tibre César
épuisé: et cet homme aujourd'hui est devenu un dieu, et Cassius n'est
qu'une misérable créature, et il faut que son corps se courbe si César
daigne seulement le saluer d'un signe de tête négligent!--En Espagne,
il eut la fièvre, et pendant l'accès je fus frappé de voir comme il
tremblait. Rien n'est plus vrai, je vis ce dieu trembler: ses lèvres
poltronnes avaient fui leurs couleurs; et ce même oeil, dont le regard
seul impose au monde, avait perdu son éclat. Je l'entendis gémir, oui,
en vérité; et cette langue qui commande aux Romains de l'écouter et de
déposer ses paroles dans leurs annales, criait: «Hélas! Titinius,
donne-moi à boire,» comme l'aurait fait une petite fille malade. Dieux
que j'atteste, je me sens confondu qu'un homme si faible de tempérament
prenne les devants sur ce monde majestueux, et seul remporte la palme.

(Acclamation, fanfare.)

BRUTUS.--Encore une acclamation! Sans doute ces applaudissements
annoncent de nouveaux honneurs qu'on accumule sur la tête de César.

CASSIUS.--Eh quoi! mon cher, il foule comme un colosse cet étroit
univers, et nous autres petits bonshommes nous circulons entre ses
jambes énormes, cherchant de tous côtés où nous pourrons trouver à la
fin d'ignominieux tombeaux. Les hommes, à de certains moments, sont
maîtres de leur sort; et si notre condition est basse, la faute, cher
Brutus, n'en est pas à nos étoiles; elle en est à nous-mêmes. Brutus et
César.... Qu'y a-t-il donc dans ce César? Pourquoi ferait-on résonner
ce nom plus que le vôtre? Écrivez-les ensemble, le vôtre est tout aussi
beau; prononcez-les, il remplit tout aussi bien la bouche; pesez-les,
son poids sera le même; employez-les pour une conjuration, Brutus
évoquera aussi facilement un esprit que César. Maintenant dites-moi,
au nom de tous les dieux ensemble, de quelle viande se nourrit donc ce
César d'aujourd'hui pour être devenu si grand? Siècle, tu es déshonoré!
Rome, tu as perdu la race des nobles courages! Quel siècle s'est écoulé
depuis le grand déluge, qui ne se soit enorgueilli que d'un seul homme?
A-t-on pu dire, jusqu'à ce jour, en parlant de Rome, que ses vastes murs
n'enfermaient qu'un seul homme? C'est bien toujours Rome, en vérité, et
la place n'y manque pas, puisqu'il n'y a qu'un seul homme. Oh! vous
et moi nous avons ouï dire à nos pères qu'il fut jadis un Brutus qui eût
aussi aisément souffert dans Rome le trône du démon éternel que celui
d'un roi.

BRUTUS.--Que vous m'aimiez, Cassius, je n'en doute point. Ce que vous
voudriez que j'entreprisse, je crois le deviner: ce que j'ai pensé sur
tout cela, et ce que je pense du temps où nous vivons, je le dirai plus
tard. Quant à présent, je désire n'être pas pressé davantage; je vous le
demande au nom de l'amitié. Ce que vous m'avez dit, je l'examinerai.
Ce que vous avez à me dire encore, je l'écouterai avec patience, et je
trouverai un moment convenable pour vous écouter et répondre sur de si
hautes matières. Jusque-là, mon noble ami, méditez sur ceci: Brutus
aimerait mieux être un villageois que de se compter pour un enfant de
Rome aux dures conditions que ce temps doit probablement nous imposer.

CASSIUS.--Je suis bien aise que le choc de mes faibles paroles ait du
moins fait jaillir cette étincelle de l'âme de Brutus.

(Rentrent César et son cortège.)

BRUTUS.--Les jeux sont terminés; César revient.

CASSIUS.--Quand ils passeront près de nous, retenez Casca par la manche;
et il vous racontera de son ton bourru tout ce qui s'est aujourd'hui
passé de remarquable.

BRUTUS.--Oui, je le ferai. Mais regardez, Cassius: la teinte de la
colère enflamme le front de César, et tout le reste a l'air d'une troupe
de serviteurs réprimandés. Les joues de Calphurnia sont pâles; Cicéron
a ce regard fureteur et flamboyant que nous lui avons vu au Capitole,
lorsque dans nos débats il était contredit par quelques sénateurs.

CASSIUS.--Casca nous dira de quoi il s'agit.

CÉSAR.--Antoine!

ANTOINE.--César.

CÉSAR.--Que j'aie toujours autour de moi des hommes gras et à la face
brillante, des gens qui dorment la nuit. Ce Cassius là-bas a un visage
hâve et décharné; il pense trop. De tels hommes sont dangereux.

ANTOINE.--Ne le crains pas, César; il n'est pas dangereux. C'est un
noble Romain et bien intentionné.

CÉSAR.--Je voudrais qu'il fût plus gras, mais je ne le crains pas.
Cependant si quelque chose en moi pouvait être sujet à la crainte, je ne
connaîtrais point d'homme que je voulusse éviter avec plus de soin que
ce maigre Cassius. Il lit beaucoup, il est grand observateur et pénètre
jusqu'au fond des actions des hommes. Il n'a point comme toi le goût
des jeux, Antoine; on ne le voit point écouter de musique. Rarement il
sourit, et il sourit alors de telle sorte qu'il a l'air de se moquer de
lui-même, et de dédaigner son propre esprit parce qu'il a pu se laisser
émouvoir à sourire de quelque chose. Les hommes de ce caractère n'ont
jamais le coeur à l'aise tant qu'ils en voient un autre plus élevé
qu'eux; et voilà ce qui les rend si dangereux. Je te dis ce qui est à
craindre plutôt que ce que je crains, car je suis toujours César. Passe
à ma droite, j'ai cette oreille dure, et dis-moi franchement ce que tu
penses de lui.

(César sort avec son cortège.)

(Casca demeure en arrière.)

CASCA.--Vous m'avez tiré par mon manteau. Voudriez-vous me parler?

BRUTUS.--Oui, Casca. Dites-nous, que s'est-il donc passé aujourd'hui,
que César ait l'air si triste?

CASCA.--Quoi! vous étiez à sa suite. N'y étiez-vous pas?

BRUTUS.--Je ne demanderais pas alors à Casca ce qui s'est passé.

CASCA.--Eh bien! on lui a offert une couronne; et quand on la lui a
offerte, il l'a repoussée ainsi du revers de la main. Alors tout le
peuple a poussé de grands cris.

BRUTUS.--Et la seconde acclamation, quelle en était la cause?

CASCA.--Mais c'était encore pour cela.

CASSIUS.--Il y a eu trois acclamations. Pourquoi la dernière?

CASCA.--Pourquoi? pour cela encore.

BRUTUS.--Est-ce que la couronne lui a été offerte trois fois?

CASCA.--Eh! vraiment oui, et trois fois il l'a repoussée, mais chaque
fois plus doucement que la précédente; et, à chacun de ses refus, mes
honnêtes voisins se remettaient à crier.

CASSIUS.--Qui lui offrait la couronne?

CASCA.--Qui? Antoine.

BRUTUS.--Dites-nous: de quelle manière l'a-t-il offerte, cher Casca?

CASCA.--Que je sois pendu si je puis vous dire la manière. C'était une
vraie momerie; je n'y faisais pas attention. J'ai vu Marc-Antoine lui
présenter une couronne: ce n'était pourtant pas non plus tout à fait une
couronne; c'était une espèce de diadème; et comme je vous l'ai dit,
il l'a repoussé une fois. Mais malgré tout cela, j'ai dans l'idée qu'il
aurait bien voulu l'avoir.--Alors Antoine la lui offre encore,--et alors
il la refuse encore,--mais j'ai toujours dans l'idée qu'il avait bien
de la peine à en détacher ses doigts.--Et alors il la lui offre une
troisième fois.--La troisième fois encore il la repousse; et à chacun de
ses refus, la populace jetait des cris de joie: ils applaudissaient de
leurs mains toutes tailladées; ils faisaient voler leurs bonnets de
nuit trempés de sueur; et parce que César refusait la couronne, ils
exhalaient en telles quantités leurs puantes haleines, que César en a
presque été suffoqué. Il s'est évanoui, et il est tombé; et pour ma part
je n'osais pas rire, de crainte, en ouvrant la bouche, de recevoir le
mauvais air.

CASSIUS.--Mais un moment, je vous en prie. Quoi! César s'est évanoui?

CASCA.--Il est tombé au milieu de la place du marché; il avait l'écume à
la bouche et ne pouvait parler.

BRUTUS.--Cela n'est point surprenant; il tombe du haut mal.

CASSIUS.--Non, ce n'est point César; c'est vous, c'est moi et l'honnête
Casca, qui tombons du haut mal.

CASCA.--Je ne sais ce que vous entendez par là; mais il est certain que
César est tombé. Si cette canaille en haillons ne l'a pas claqué et
sifflé, selon que sa conduite leur plaisait ou déplaisait, comme ils ont
coutume de faire aux acteurs sur le théâtre, je ne suis pas un honnête
homme.

BRUTUS.--Qu'a-t-il dit en revenant à lui?

CASCA.--Eh! vraiment, avant de s'évanouir, quand il a vu ce troupeau de
plébéiens se réjouir de ce qu'il refusait la couronne, il vous a ouvert
son habit et leur a offert sa poitrine à percer. Pour peu que j'eusse
été un de ces ouvriers, si je ne l'avais pas pris au mot, je veux aller
en enfer avec les coquins. Et alors il est tombé. Lorsqu'il est revenu à
lui, il a dit «que s'il avait fait ou dit quelque chose de déplacé,
il priait leurs Excellences de l'attribuer à son infirmité.» Trois ou
quatre créatures autour de moi se sont écriées: «Hélas! la bonne âme!»
Elles lui ont pardonné de tout leur coeur, mais il n'y a pas à y faire
grande attention. César eût égorgé leurs mères, qu'ils en auraient dit
autant.

BRUTUS.--Et c'est après cela qu'il est revenu si chagrin?

CASCA.--Oui.

CASSIUS.--Cicéron a-t-il dit quelque chose?

CASCA.--Oui, il a parlé grec.

CASSIUS.--Dans quel sens?

CASCA.--Ma foi, si je peux vous le dire, que je ne vous regarde jamais
en face. Ceux qui l'ont compris souriaient l'un à l'autre en secouant
la tête; mais pour ma part, je n'y entendais que du grec. Je puis vous
dire encore d'autres nouvelles. Flavius et Marullus, pour avoir ôté
les ornements qu'on avait mis aux statues de César, sont réduits au
silence. Adieu; il est bien d'autres choses absurdes, si je pouvais
m'en souvenir.

CASSIUS.--Voulez-vous souper ce soir avec moi, Casca?

CASCA.--Non, je suis engagé.

CASSIUS.--Demain, voulez-vous que nous dînions ensemble?

CASCA.--Oui, si je suis vivant, si vous ne changez pas d'avis, et si
votre dîner vaut la peine d'être mangé.

CASSIUS.--Il suffit: je vous attendrai.

CASCA.--Attendez-moi. Adieu tous deux.

(Il sort.)

BRUTUS.--Qu'il s'est abruti en prenant des années! Lorsque nous le
voyions à l'école, c'était un esprit plein de vivacité.

CASSIUS.--Et malgré les formes pesantes qu'il affecte, il est le même
encore lorsqu'il s'agit d'exécuter quelque entreprise noble et hardie.
Cette rudesse sert d'assaisonnement à son esprit; elle réveille le goût,
et fait digérer ses paroles de meilleur appétit.

BRUTUS.--Il est vrai. Pour le moment je vais vous laisser. Demain, si
vous voulez que nous causions ensemble, j'irai vous trouver chez vous;
ou, si vous l'aimez mieux, venez chez moi, je vous y attendrai.

CASSIUS.--Volontiers, j'irai. D'ici là, songez à l'univers. (_Brutus
sort._) Bien, Brutus, tu es généreux; et, cependant, je le vois, le
noble métal dont tu es formé peut être travaillé dans un sens contraire
à celui où le porte sa disposition naturelle. Il est donc convenable
que les nobles esprits se tiennent toujours dans la société de leurs
semblables; car, quel est l'homme si ferme qu'on ne puisse le séduire?
César ne peut me souffrir, mais il aime Brutus. Si j'étais Brutus
aujourd'hui, et que Brutus fût Cassius, César n'aurait pas d'empire sur
moi.--Je veux cette nuit jeter sur ses fenêtres des billets tracés en
caractères différents, comme venant de divers citoyens et exprimant tous
la haute opinion que Rome a de lui. J'y glisserai quelques mots obscurs
sur l'ambition de César; et, après cela, que César se tienne ferme, car
nous la renverserons, ou nous aurons de plus mauvais jours encore à
passer.

(Il sort.)



minimap