Ez az oldal sütiket használ

A portál felületén sütiket (cookies) használ, vagyis a rendszer adatokat tárol az Ön böngészőjében. A sütik személyek azonosítására nem alkalmasak, szolgáltatásaink biztosításához szükségesek. Az oldal használatával Ön beleegyezik a sütik használatába.

Hírek

Shakespeare, William: Romeo és Júlia (Részlet) (Romeo and Juliet (Detail) Magyar nyelven)

Shakespeare, William portréja

Romeo and Juliet (Detail) (Angol)


ACT I

PROLOGUE

Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whole misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.



SCENE I. Verona. A public place.

Enter SAMPSON and GREGORY, of the house of Capulet, armed with swords and bucklers

SAMPSON

Gregory, o' my word, we'll not carry coals.

GREGORY

No, for then we should be colliers.

SAMPSON

I mean, an we be in choler, we'll draw.

GREGORY

Ay, while you live, draw your neck out o' the collar.

SAMPSON

I strike quickly, being moved.

GREGORY

But thou art not quickly moved to strike.

SAMPSON

A dog of the house of Montague moves me.

GREGORY

To move is to stir; and to be valiant is to stand:
therefore, if thou art moved, thou runn'st away.

SAMPSON

A dog of that house shall move me to stand: I will
take the wall of any man or maid of Montague's.

GREGORY

That shows thee a weak slave; for the weakest goes
to the wall.

SAMPSON

True; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels,
are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push
Montague's men from the wall, and thrust his maids
to the wall.

GREGORY

The quarrel is between our masters and us their men.

SAMPSON

'Tis all one, I will show myself a tyrant: when I
have fought with the men, I will be cruel with the
maids, and cut off their heads.

GREGORY

The heads of the maids?

SAMPSON

Ay, the heads of the maids, or their maidenheads;
take it in what sense thou wilt.

GREGORY

They must take it in sense that feel it.

SAMPSON

Me they shall feel while I am able to stand: and
'tis known I am a pretty piece of flesh.

GREGORY

'Tis well thou art not fish; if thou hadst, thou
hadst been poor John. Draw thy tool! here comes
two of the house of the Montagues.

SAMPSON

My naked weapon is out: quarrel, I will back thee.

GREGORY

How! turn thy back and run?

SAMPSON

Fear me not.

GREGORY

No, marry; I fear thee!

SAMPSON

Let us take the law of our sides; let them begin.

GREGORY

I will frown as I pass by, and let them take it as
they list.

SAMPSON

Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them;
which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it.

Enter ABRAHAM and BALTHASAR

ABRAHAM

Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

SAMPSON

I do bite my thumb, sir.

ABRAHAM

Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

SAMPSON

[Aside to GREGORY] Is the law of our side, if I say
ay?

GREGORY

No.

SAMPSON

No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir, but I
bite my thumb, sir.

GREGORY

Do you quarrel, sir?

ABRAHAM

Quarrel sir! no, sir.

SAMPSON

If you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you.

ABRAHAM

No better.

SAMPSON

Well, sir.

GREGORY

Say 'better:' here comes one of my master's kinsmen.

SAMPSON

Yes, better, sir.

ABRAHAM

You lie.

SAMPSON

Draw, if you be men. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.

They fight

Enter BENVOLIO

BENVOLIO

Part, fools!
Put up your swords; you know not what you do.

Beats down their swords

Enter TYBALT

TYBALT

What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds?
Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death.

BENVOLIO

I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword,
Or manage it to part these men with me.

TYBALT

What, drawn, and talk of peace! I hate the word,
As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee:
Have at thee, coward!

They fight

Enter, several of both houses, who join the fray; then enter Citizens, with clubs

First Citizen

Clubs, bills, and partisans! strike! beat them down!
Down with the Capulets! down with the Montagues!

Enter CAPULET in his gown, and LADY CAPULET

CAPULET

What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!

LADY CAPULET

A crutch, a crutch! why call you for a sword?

CAPULET

My sword, I say! Old Montague is come,
And flourishes his blade in spite of me.

Enter MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE

MONTAGUE

Thou villain Capulet,--Hold me not, let me go.

LADY MONTAGUE

Thou shalt not stir a foot to seek a foe.

Enter PRINCE, with Attendants

PRINCE

Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,
Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,--
Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts,
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
With purple fountains issuing from your veins,
On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word,
By thee, old Capulet, and Montague,
Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets,
And made Verona's ancient citizens
Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments,
To wield old partisans, in hands as old,
Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate:
If ever you disturb our streets again,
Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.
For this time, all the rest depart away:
You Capulet; shall go along with me:
And, Montague, come you this afternoon,
To know our further pleasure in this case,
To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.
Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.

Exeunt all but MONTAGUE, LADY MONTAGUE, and BENVOLIO

MONTAGUE

Who set this ancient quarrel new abroach?
Speak, nephew, were you by when it began?

BENVOLIO

Here were the servants of your adversary,
And yours, close fighting ere I did approach:
I drew to part them: in the instant came
The fiery Tybalt, with his sword prepared,
Which, as he breathed defiance to my ears,
He swung about his head and cut the winds,
Who nothing hurt withal hiss'd him in scorn:
While we were interchanging thrusts and blows,
Came more and more and fought on part and part,
Till the prince came, who parted either part.

LADY MONTAGUE

O, where is Romeo? saw you him to-day?
Right glad I am he was not at this fray.

BENVOLIO

Madam, an hour before the worshipp'd sun
Peer'd forth the golden window of the east,
A troubled mind drave me to walk abroad;
Where, underneath the grove of sycamore
That westward rooteth from the city's side,
So early walking did I see your son:
Towards him I made, but he was ware of me
And stole into the covert of the wood:
I, measuring his affections by my own,
That most are busied when they're most alone,
Pursued my humour not pursuing his,
And gladly shunn'd who gladly fled from me.

MONTAGUE

Many a morning hath he there been seen,
With tears augmenting the fresh morning dew.
Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs;
But all so soon as the all-cheering sun
Should in the furthest east begin to draw
The shady curtains from Aurora's bed,
Away from the light steals home my heavy son,
And private in his chamber pens himself,
Shuts up his windows, locks far daylight out
And makes himself an artificial night:
Black and portentous must this humour prove,
Unless good counsel may the cause remove.

BENVOLIO

My noble uncle, do you know the cause?

MONTAGUE

I neither know it nor can learn of him.

BENVOLIO

Have you importuned him by any means?

MONTAGUE

Both by myself and many other friends:
But he, his own affections' counsellor,
Is to himself--I will not say how true--
But to himself so secret and so close,
So far from sounding and discovery,
As is the bud bit with an envious worm,
Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air,
Or dedicate his beauty to the sun.
Could we but learn from whence his sorrows grow.
We would as willingly give cure as know.

Enter ROMEO

BENVOLIO

See, where he comes: so please you, step aside;
I'll know his grievance, or be much denied.

MONTAGUE

I would thou wert so happy by thy stay,
To hear true shrift. Come, madam, let's away.

Exeunt MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE

BENVOLIO

Good-morrow, cousin.

ROMEO

Is the day so young?

BENVOLIO

But new struck nine.

ROMEO

Ay me! sad hours seem long.
Was that my father that went hence so fast?

BENVOLIO

It was. What sadness lengthens Romeo's hours?

ROMEO

Not having that, which, having, makes them short.

BENVOLIO

In love?

ROMEO

Out--

BENVOLIO

Of love?

ROMEO

Out of her favour, where I am in love.

BENVOLIO

Alas, that love, so gentle in his view,
Should be so tyrannous and rough in proof!

ROMEO

Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still,
Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will!
Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here?
Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.
Here's much to do with hate, but more with love.
Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!
O any thing, of nothing first create!
O heavy lightness! serious vanity!
Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire,
sick health!
Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!
This love feel I, that feel no love in this.
Dost thou not laugh?

BENVOLIO

No, coz, I rather weep.

ROMEO

Good heart, at what?

BENVOLIO

At thy good heart's oppression.

ROMEO

Why, such is love's transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,
Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest
With more of thine: this love that thou hast shown
Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.
Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs;
Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes;
Being vex'd a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears:
What is it else? a madness most discreet,
A choking gall and a preserving sweet.
Farewell, my coz.

BENVOLIO

Soft! I will go along;
An if you leave me so, you do me wrong.

ROMEO

Tut, I have lost myself; I am not here;
This is not Romeo, he's some other where.

BENVOLIO

Tell me in sadness, who is that you love.

ROMEO

What, shall I groan and tell thee?

BENVOLIO

Groan! why, no.
But sadly tell me who.

ROMEO

Bid a sick man in sadness make his will:
Ah, word ill urged to one that is so ill!
In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.

BENVOLIO

I aim'd so near, when I supposed you loved.

ROMEO

A right good mark-man! And she's fair I love.

BENVOLIO

A right fair mark, fair coz, is soonest hit.

ROMEO

Well, in that hit you miss: she'll not be hit
With Cupid's arrow; she hath Dian's wit;
And, in strong proof of chastity well arm'd,
From love's weak childish bow she lives unharm'd.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
Nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O, she is rich in beauty, only poor,
That when she dies with beauty dies her store.

BENVOLIO

Then she hath sworn that she will still live chaste?

ROMEO

She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste,
For beauty starved with her severity
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise, wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair:
She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead that live to tell it now.

BENVOLIO

Be ruled by me, forget to think of her.

ROMEO

O, teach me how I should forget to think.

BENVOLIO

By giving liberty unto thine eyes;
Examine other beauties.

ROMEO

'Tis the way
To call hers exquisite, in question more:
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies' brows
Being black put us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost:
Show me a mistress that is passing fair,
What doth her beauty serve, but as a note
Where I may read who pass'd that passing fair?
Farewell: thou canst not teach me to forget.

BENVOLIO

I'll pay that doctrine, or else die in debt.

Exeunt

SCENE II. A street.

Enter CAPULET, PARIS, and Servant

CAPULET

But Montague is bound as well as I,
In penalty alike; and 'tis not hard, I think,
For men so old as we to keep the peace.

PARIS

Of honourable reckoning are you both;
And pity 'tis you lived at odds so long.
But now, my lord, what say you to my suit?

CAPULET

But saying o'er what I have said before:
My child is yet a stranger in the world;
She hath not seen the change of fourteen years,
Let two more summers wither in their pride,
Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride.

PARIS

Younger than she are happy mothers made.

CAPULET

And too soon marr'd are those so early made.
The earth hath swallow'd all my hopes but she,
She is the hopeful lady of my earth:
But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart,
My will to her consent is but a part;
An she agree, within her scope of choice
Lies my consent and fair according voice.
This night I hold an old accustom'd feast,
Whereto I have invited many a guest,
Such as I love; and you, among the store,
One more, most welcome, makes my number more.
At my poor house look to behold this night
Earth-treading stars that make dark heaven light:
Such comfort as do lusty young men feel
When well-apparell'd April on the heel
Of limping winter treads, even such delight
Among fresh female buds shall you this night
Inherit at my house; hear all, all see,
And like her most whose merit most shall be:
Which on more view, of many mine being one
May stand in number, though in reckoning none,
Come, go with me.

To Servant, giving a paper

Go, sirrah, trudge about
Through fair Verona; find those persons out
Whose names are written there, and to them say,
My house and welcome on their pleasure stay.

Exeunt CAPULET and PARIS

Servant

Find them out whose names are written here! It is
written, that the shoemaker should meddle with his
yard, and the tailor with his last, the fisher with
his pencil, and the painter with his nets; but I am
sent to find those persons whose names are here
writ, and can never find what names the writing
person hath here writ. I must to the learned.--In good time.

Enter BENVOLIO and ROMEO

BENVOLIO

Tut, man, one fire burns out another's burning,
One pain is lessen'd by another's anguish;
Turn giddy, and be holp by backward turning;
One desperate grief cures with another's languish:
Take thou some new infection to thy eye,
And the rank poison of the old will die.

ROMEO

Your plaintain-leaf is excellent for that.

BENVOLIO

For what, I pray thee?

ROMEO

For your broken shin.

BENVOLIO

Why, Romeo, art thou mad?

ROMEO

Not mad, but bound more than a mad-man is;
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
Whipp'd and tormented and--God-den, good fellow.

Servant

God gi' god-den. I pray, sir, can you read?

ROMEO

Ay, mine own fortune in my misery.

Servant

Perhaps you have learned it without book: but, I
pray, can you read any thing you see?

ROMEO

Ay, if I know the letters and the language.

Servant

Ye say honestly: rest you merry!

ROMEO

Stay, fellow; I can read.

Reads

'Signior Martino and his wife and daughters;
County Anselme and his beauteous sisters; the lady
widow of Vitravio; Signior Placentio and his lovely
nieces; Mercutio and his brother Valentine; mine
uncle Capulet, his wife and daughters; my fair niece
Rosaline; Livia; Signior Valentio and his cousin
Tybalt, Lucio and the lively Helena.' A fair
assembly: whither should they come?

Servant

Up.

ROMEO

Whither?

Servant

To supper; to our house.

ROMEO

Whose house?

Servant

My master's.

ROMEO

Indeed, I should have ask'd you that before.

Servant

Now I'll tell you without asking: my master is the
great rich Capulet; and if you be not of the house
of Montagues, I pray, come and crush a cup of wine.
Rest you merry!

Exit

BENVOLIO

At this same ancient feast of Capulet's
Sups the fair Rosaline whom thou so lovest,
With all the admired beauties of Verona:
Go thither; and, with unattainted eye,
Compare her face with some that I shall show,
And I will make thee think thy swan a crow.

ROMEO

When the devout religion of mine eye
Maintains such falsehood, then turn tears to fires;
And these, who often drown'd could never die,
Transparent heretics, be burnt for liars!
One fairer than my love! the all-seeing sun
Ne'er saw her match since first the world begun.

BENVOLIO

Tut, you saw her fair, none else being by,
Herself poised with herself in either eye:
But in that crystal scales let there be weigh'd
Your lady's love against some other maid
That I will show you shining at this feast,
And she shall scant show well that now shows best.

ROMEO

I'll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendor of mine own.

Exeunt

SCENE III. A room in Capulet's house.

Enter LADY CAPULET and Nurse

LADY CAPULET

Nurse, where's my daughter? call her forth to me.

Nurse

Now, by my maidenhead, at twelve year old,
I bade her come. What, lamb! what, ladybird!
God forbid! Where's this girl? What, Juliet!

Enter JULIET

JULIET

How now! who calls?

Nurse

Your mother.

JULIET

Madam, I am here.
What is your will?

LADY CAPULET

This is the matter:--Nurse, give leave awhile,
We must talk in secret:--nurse, come back again;
I have remember'd me, thou's hear our counsel.
Thou know'st my daughter's of a pretty age.

Nurse

Faith, I can tell her age unto an hour.

LADY CAPULET

She's not fourteen.

Nurse

I'll lay fourteen of my teeth,--
And yet, to my teeth be it spoken, I have but four--
She is not fourteen. How long is it now
To Lammas-tide?

LADY CAPULET

A fortnight and odd days.

Nurse

Even or odd, of all days in the year,
Come Lammas-eve at night shall she be fourteen.
Susan and she--God rest all Christian souls!--
Were of an age: well, Susan is with God;
She was too good for me: but, as I said,
On Lammas-eve at night shall she be fourteen;
That shall she, marry; I remember it well.
'Tis since the earthquake now eleven years;
And she was wean'd,--I never shall forget it,--
Of all the days of the year, upon that day:
For I had then laid wormwood to my dug,
Sitting in the sun under the dove-house wall;
My lord and you were then at Mantua:--
Nay, I do bear a brain:--but, as I said,
When it did taste the wormwood on the nipple
Of my dug and felt it bitter, pretty fool,
To see it tetchy and fall out with the dug!
Shake quoth the dove-house: 'twas no need, I trow,
To bid me trudge:
And since that time it is eleven years;
For then she could stand alone; nay, by the rood,
She could have run and waddled all about;
For even the day before, she broke her brow:
And then my husband--God be with his soul!
A' was a merry man--took up the child:
'Yea,' quoth he, 'dost thou fall upon thy face?
Thou wilt fall backward when thou hast more wit;
Wilt thou not, Jule?' and, by my holidame,
The pretty wretch left crying and said 'Ay.'
To see, now, how a jest shall come about!
I warrant, an I should live a thousand years,
I never should forget it: 'Wilt thou not, Jule?' quoth he;
And, pretty fool, it stinted and said 'Ay.'

LADY CAPULET

Enough of this; I pray thee, hold thy peace.

Nurse

Yes, madam: yet I cannot choose but laugh,
To think it should leave crying and say 'Ay.'
And yet, I warrant, it had upon its brow
A bump as big as a young cockerel's stone;
A parlous knock; and it cried bitterly:
'Yea,' quoth my husband,'fall'st upon thy face?
Thou wilt fall backward when thou comest to age;
Wilt thou not, Jule?' it stinted and said 'Ay.'

JULIET

And stint thou too, I pray thee, nurse, say I.

Nurse

Peace, I have done. God mark thee to his grace!
Thou wast the prettiest babe that e'er I nursed:
An I might live to see thee married once,
I have my wish.

LADY CAPULET

Marry, that 'marry' is the very theme
I came to talk of. Tell me, daughter Juliet,
How stands your disposition to be married?

JULIET

It is an honour that I dream not of.

Nurse

An honour! were not I thine only nurse,
I would say thou hadst suck'd wisdom from thy teat.

LADY CAPULET

Well, think of marriage now; younger than you,
Here in Verona, ladies of esteem,
Are made already mothers: by my count,
I was your mother much upon these years
That you are now a maid. Thus then in brief:
The valiant Paris seeks you for his love.

Nurse

A man, young lady! lady, such a man
As all the world--why, he's a man of wax.

LADY CAPULET

Verona's summer hath not such a flower.

Nurse

Nay, he's a flower; in faith, a very flower.

LADY CAPULET

What say you? can you love the gentleman?
This night you shall behold him at our feast;
Read o'er the volume of young Paris' face,
And find delight writ there with beauty's pen;
Examine every married lineament,
And see how one another lends content
And what obscured in this fair volume lies
Find written in the margent of his eyes.
This precious book of love, this unbound lover,
To beautify him, only lacks a cover:
The fish lives in the sea, and 'tis much pride
For fair without the fair within to hide:
That book in many's eyes doth share the glory,
That in gold clasps locks in the golden story;
So shall you share all that he doth possess,
By having him, making yourself no less.

Nurse

No less! nay, bigger; women grow by men.

LADY CAPULET

Speak briefly, can you like of Paris' love?

JULIET

I'll look to like, if looking liking move:
But no more deep will I endart mine eye
Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.

Enter a Servant

Servant

Madam, the guests are come, supper served up, you
called, my young lady asked for, the nurse cursed in
the pantry, and every thing in extremity. I must
hence to wait; I beseech you, follow straight.

LADY CAPULET

We follow thee.

Exit Servant

Juliet, the county stays.

Nurse

Go, girl, seek happy nights to happy days.

Exeunt

SCENE IV. A street.

Enter ROMEO, MERCUTIO, BENVOLIO, with five or six Maskers, Torch-bearers, and others

ROMEO

What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?
Or shall we on without a apology?

BENVOLIO

The date is out of such prolixity:
We'll have no Cupid hoodwink'd with a scarf,
Bearing a Tartar's painted bow of lath,
Scaring the ladies like a crow-keeper;
Nor no without-book prologue, faintly spoke
After the prompter, for our entrance:
But let them measure us by what they will;
We'll measure them a measure, and be gone.

ROMEO

Give me a torch: I am not for this ambling;
Being but heavy, I will bear the light.

MERCUTIO

Nay, gentle Romeo, we must have you dance.

ROMEO

Not I, believe me: you have dancing shoes
With nimble soles: I have a soul of lead
So stakes me to the ground I cannot move.

MERCUTIO

You are a lover; borrow Cupid's wings,
And soar with them above a common bound.

ROMEO

I am too sore enpierced with his shaft
To soar with his light feathers, and so bound,
I cannot bound a pitch above dull woe:
Under love's heavy burden do I sink.

MERCUTIO

And, to sink in it, should you burden love;
Too great oppression for a tender thing.

ROMEO

Is love a tender thing? it is too rough,
Too rude, too boisterous, and it pricks like thorn.

MERCUTIO

If love be rough with you, be rough with love;
Prick love for pricking, and you beat love down.
Give me a case to put my visage in:
A visor for a visor! what care I
What curious eye doth quote deformities?
Here are the beetle brows shall blush for me.

BENVOLIO

Come, knock and enter; and no sooner in,
But every man betake him to his legs.

ROMEO

A torch for me: let wantons light of heart
Tickle the senseless rushes with their heels,
For I am proverb'd with a grandsire phrase;
I'll be a candle-holder, and look on.
The game was ne'er so fair, and I am done.

MERCUTIO

Tut, dun's the mouse, the constable's own word:
If thou art dun, we'll draw thee from the mire
Of this sir-reverence love, wherein thou stick'st
Up to the ears. Come, we burn daylight, ho!

ROMEO

Nay, that's not so.

MERCUTIO

I mean, sir, in delay
We waste our lights in vain, like lamps by day.
Take our good meaning, for our judgment sits
Five times in that ere once in our five wits.

ROMEO

And we mean well in going to this mask;
But 'tis no wit to go.

MERCUTIO

Why, may one ask?

ROMEO

I dream'd a dream to-night.

MERCUTIO

And so did I.

ROMEO

Well, what was yours?

MERCUTIO

That dreamers often lie.

ROMEO

In bed asleep, while they do dream things true.

MERCUTIO

O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you.
She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes
In shape no bigger than an agate-stone
On the fore-finger of an alderman,
Drawn with a team of little atomies
Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep;
Her wagon-spokes made of long spiders' legs,
The cover of the wings of grasshoppers,
The traces of the smallest spider's web,
The collars of the moonshine's watery beams,
Her whip of cricket's bone, the lash of film,
Her wagoner a small grey-coated gnat,
Not so big as a round little worm
Prick'd from the lazy finger of a maid;
Her chariot is an empty hazel-nut
Made by the joiner squirrel or old grub,
Time out o' mind the fairies' coachmakers.
And in this state she gallops night by night
Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love;
O'er courtiers' knees, that dream on court'sies straight,
O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees,
O'er ladies ' lips, who straight on kisses dream,
Which oft the angry Mab with blisters plagues,
Because their breaths with sweetmeats tainted are:
Sometime she gallops o'er a courtier's nose,
And then dreams he of smelling out a suit;
And sometime comes she with a tithe-pig's tail
Tickling a parson's nose as a' lies asleep,
Then dreams, he of another benefice:
Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck,
And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats,
Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades,
Of healths five-fathom deep; and then anon
Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes,
And being thus frighted swears a prayer or two
And sleeps again. This is that very Mab
That plats the manes of horses in the night,
And bakes the elflocks in foul sluttish hairs,
Which once untangled, much misfortune bodes:
This is the hag, when maids lie on their backs,
That presses them and learns them first to bear,
Making them women of good carriage:
This is she--

ROMEO

Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace!
Thou talk'st of nothing.

MERCUTIO

True, I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy,
Which is as thin of substance as the air
And more inconstant than the wind, who wooes
Even now the frozen bosom of the north,
And, being anger'd, puffs away from thence,
Turning his face to the dew-dropping south.

BENVOLIO

This wind, you talk of, blows us from ourselves;
Supper is done, and we shall come too late.

ROMEO

I fear, too early: for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night's revels and expire the term
Of a despised life closed in my breast
By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
But He, that hath the steerage of my course,
Direct my sail! On, lusty gentlemen.

BENVOLIO

Strike, drum.

Exeunt

SCENE V. A hall in Capulet's house.

Musicians waiting. Enter Servingmen with napkins

First Servant

Where's Potpan, that he helps not to take away? He
shift a trencher? he scrape a trencher!

Second Servant

When good manners shall lie all in one or two men's
hands and they unwashed too, 'tis a foul thing.

First Servant

Away with the joint-stools, remove the
court-cupboard, look to the plate. Good thou, save
me a piece of marchpane; and, as thou lovest me, let
the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell.
Antony, and Potpan!

Second Servant

Ay, boy, ready.

First Servant

You are looked for and called for, asked for and
sought for, in the great chamber.

Second Servant

We cannot be here and there too. Cheerly, boys; be
brisk awhile, and the longer liver take all.

Enter CAPULET, with JULIET and others of his house, meeting the Guests and Maskers

CAPULET

Welcome, gentlemen! ladies that have their toes
Unplagued with corns will have a bout with you.
Ah ha, my mistresses! which of you all
Will now deny to dance? she that makes dainty,
She, I'll swear, hath corns; am I come near ye now?
Welcome, gentlemen! I have seen the day
That I have worn a visor and could tell
A whispering tale in a fair lady's ear,
Such as would please: 'tis gone, 'tis gone, 'tis gone:
You are welcome, gentlemen! come, musicians, play.
A hall, a hall! give room! and foot it, girls.

Music plays, and they dance

More light, you knaves; and turn the tables up,
And quench the fire, the room is grown too hot.
Ah, sirrah, this unlook'd-for sport comes well.
Nay, sit, nay, sit, good cousin Capulet;
For you and I are past our dancing days:
How long is't now since last yourself and I
Were in a mask?

Second Capulet

By'r lady, thirty years.

CAPULET

What, man! 'tis not so much, 'tis not so much:
'Tis since the nuptials of Lucentio,
Come pentecost as quickly as it will,
Some five and twenty years; and then we mask'd.

Second Capulet

'Tis more, 'tis more, his son is elder, sir;
His son is thirty.

CAPULET

Will you tell me that?
His son was but a ward two years ago.

ROMEO

[To a Servingman] What lady is that, which doth
enrich the hand
Of yonder knight?

Servant

I know not, sir.

ROMEO

O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear;
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows,
As yonder lady o'er her fellows shows.
The measure done, I'll watch her place of stand,
And, touching hers, make blessed my rude hand.
Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight!
For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.

TYBALT

This, by his voice, should be a Montague.
Fetch me my rapier, boy. What dares the slave
Come hither, cover'd with an antic face,
To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?
Now, by the stock and honour of my kin,
To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin.

CAPULET

Why, how now, kinsman! wherefore storm you so?

TYBALT

Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe,
A villain that is hither come in spite,
To scorn at our solemnity this night.

CAPULET

Young Romeo is it?

TYBALT

'Tis he, that villain Romeo.

CAPULET

Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone;
He bears him like a portly gentleman;
And, to say truth, Verona brags of him
To be a virtuous and well-govern'd youth:
I would not for the wealth of all the town
Here in my house do him disparagement:
Therefore be patient, take no note of him:
It is my will, the which if thou respect,
Show a fair presence and put off these frowns,
And ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.

TYBALT

It fits, when such a villain is a guest:
I'll not endure him.

CAPULET

He shall be endured:
What, goodman boy! I say, he shall: go to;
Am I the master here, or you? go to.
You'll not endure him! God shall mend my soul!
You'll make a mutiny among my guests!
You will set cock-a-hoop! you'll be the man!

TYBALT

Why, uncle, 'tis a shame.

CAPULET

Go to, go to;
You are a saucy boy: is't so, indeed?
This trick may chance to scathe you, I know what:
You must contrary me! marry, 'tis time.
Well said, my hearts! You are a princox; go:
Be quiet, or--More light, more light! For shame!
I'll make you quiet. What, cheerly, my hearts!

TYBALT

Patience perforce with wilful choler meeting
Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting.
I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall
Now seeming sweet convert to bitter gall.

Exit

ROMEO

[To JULIET] If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:
My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

JULIET

Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.

ROMEO

Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?

JULIET

Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

ROMEO

O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do;
They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.

JULIET

Saints do not move, though grant for prayers' sake.

ROMEO

Then move not, while my prayer's effect I take.
Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purged.

JULIET

Then have my lips the sin that they have took.

ROMEO

Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged!
Give me my sin again.

JULIET

You kiss by the book.

Nurse

Madam, your mother craves a word with you.

ROMEO

What is her mother?

Nurse

Marry, bachelor,
Her mother is the lady of the house,
And a good lady, and a wise and virtuous
I nursed her daughter, that you talk'd withal;
I tell you, he that can lay hold of her
Shall have the chinks.

ROMEO

Is she a Capulet?
O dear account! my life is my foe's debt.

BENVOLIO

Away, begone; the sport is at the best.

ROMEO

Ay, so I fear; the more is my unrest.

CAPULET

Nay, gentlemen, prepare not to be gone;
We have a trifling foolish banquet towards.
Is it e'en so? why, then, I thank you all
I thank you, honest gentlemen; good night.
More torches here! Come on then, let's to bed.
Ah, sirrah, by my fay, it waxes late:
I'll to my rest.

Exeunt all but JULIET and Nurse

JULIET

Come hither, nurse. What is yond gentleman?

Nurse

The son and heir of old Tiberio.

JULIET

What's he that now is going out of door?

Nurse

Marry, that, I think, be young Petrucio.

JULIET

What's he that follows there, that would not dance?

Nurse

I know not.

JULIET

Go ask his name: if he be married.
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

Nurse

His name is Romeo, and a Montague;
The only son of your great enemy.

JULIET

My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.

Nurse

What's this? what's this?

JULIET

A rhyme I learn'd even now
Of one I danced withal.

One calls within 'Juliet.'

Nurse

Anon, anon!
Come, let's away; the strangers all are gone.

Exeunt



ACT II
PROLOGUE
Enter Chorus
Chorus
Now old desire doth in his death-bed lie,
And young affection gapes to be his heir;
That fair for which love groan'd for and would die,
With tender Juliet match'd, is now not fair.
Now Romeo is beloved and loves again,
Alike betwitched by the charm of looks,
But to his foe supposed he must complain,
And she steal love's sweet bait from fearful hooks:
Being held a foe, he may not have access
To breathe such vows as lovers use to swear;
And she as much in love, her means much less
To meet her new-beloved any where:
But passion lends them power, time means, to meet
Tempering extremities with extreme sweet.
Exit



Romeo és Júlia (Részlet) (Magyar)


ELŐHANG

KAR
(jön) Két nagy család élt a szép Veronába,
Ez lesz a szín, utunk ide vezet.
Vak gyűlölettel harcoltak hiába,
S polgárvér fertezett polgárkezet.
Vad ágyékukból két baljós szerelmes
Rossz csillagok világán fakadott,
És a szülők, hogy gyermekük is elvesz,
Elföldelik az ősi haragot.
Szörnyű szerelmüket, mely bírhatatlan,
Szülők tusáját, mely sosem apad,
Csak amikor már sarjuk föld alatt van:
Ezt mondja el a kétórás darab.
Néző, türelmes füllel jöjj, segédkezz,
És ami csonka itten, az egész lesz.



ELSŐ FELVONÁS

1. SZÍN

Verona. Köztér.
Sámson és Gergely karddal, pajzzsal fölfegyverkezve jön

SÁMSON
Na, Gergő, most már aztán semmit se fogunk zsebre vágni.

GERGELY
Az nem is tanácsos. Mivelhogy aki zsebre vág valamit, azt nyomban dutyiba vágják.

SÁMSON
Nem érted. Úgy kirántom a kardom, hogy olyant még nem ettek.

GERGELY
Hát ebben már igazságod lehet. Kirántott kardot még bizonyára nem ettek.

SÁMSON
Ha én fölindulok, akkor mindjárt vágok.

GERGELY
Tudod, mit vágsz? Pofákat. De nem a másokét. Ahhoz te nehezen indulsz föl, komé.

SÁMSON
De csak jöjjön ide egy Montague-kutya, tudomisten, fölindulok.

GERGELY
Nézd: aki fölindul, az mozog, ennélfogva ha fölindulsz, el is indulsz. A bátor azonban áll.

SÁMSON
Nem áll. Mihelyt megpillantok egy Montague-kutyát, föl is indulok, meg is állok, mint a cövek. A Montague-ék minden pereputtyát fal mellé szorítom.

GERGELY
De mi nem lányokkal harcolunk, komé.

SÁMSON
Bánom is én. Én senkivel se ösmerek irgalmat: ha a férfiakat letepertem, következnek a lányok.

GERGELY
Csakhogy ezt ám a gazdánk nem hagyja helyben.

SÁMSON
Majd helybenhagyom őket én.

GERGELY
Érzed annak a súlyát, amit most mondasz?

SÁMSON
Majd megérzik a lányok: nagydarab marha ember vagyok.

GERGELY
Marha vagy, annyi szent, nagy marha. Rántsd ki a fringiád, jön két Montague-cseléd.

SÁMSON
Kard-ki-kard. Köss beléjük elül, én majd födözlek hátul.

GERGELY
De én már hátul se födözlek föl.

SÁMSON
Sose félts engem.

GERGELY
Félt a nyavalya.

SÁMSON
Ne sértsük meg a törvényt: hadd kezdjék ők.

GERGELY
Én majd elsétálok előttük: pofákat vágok rájuk. Értsék, ahogy akarják.

SÁMSON
És ahogy merik. Én pedig fügét mutatok nekik. Tűrjék, ha van hozzá pofájuk.

Ábrahám, Boldizsár jön

ÁBRAHÁM
Nekünk mutatja kend azt a fügét?

SÁMSON
Csak úgy fügét mutatok.

ÁBRAHÁM
Nekünk mutatja kend azt a fügét?

SÁMSON
(félre Gergelyhez) Te, megsértjük avval a törvényt, ha azt mondom, hogy nekik mutatom?

GERGELY
(félre Sámsonhoz) Dehogy.

SÁMSON
Nem kendteknek mutatom, csak úgy fügét mutatok.

GERGELY
Talán belénk akar kend kötni?

ÁBRAHÁM
Dehogyis akarok belekötni kendtekbe.

GERGELY
Mert ha akar, állok elébe: az én gazdám van olyan úr, mint a kendé.

ÁBRAHÁM
De nem különb.

SÁMSON
No jól van, komé, jól van.

GERGELY
(félre Sámsonhoz) Mondd, hogy különb: itt jön a gazdánk egyik atyjafia.

SÁMSON
Különb az, komé, különb.

ÁBRAHÁM
Hazudsz.

SÁMSON
Ha férfiak vagytok, vágjatok beléjük. Gergő, most mutasd a mestervágásod.

Vívnak, Benvolio jön

BENVOLIO
Széjjel, bolondok! (Leüti kardjukat)
Be kardotok. Nem tudják, mit csinálnak.

Tybalt jön

TYBALT
Hát karddal állsz e pipogyák közé?
Na rajta, és nézz szembe a halállal.

BENVOLIO
Békét akartam: dugd be kardodat,
Vagy jöjj s mi együtt válasszuk el őket.

TYBALT
Karddal papolsz békét? Utálom azt,
Akár a poklot s minden Montague-t.
Rongy, védd magad!

Vívnak. Mind a két házból nép tódul ki, beleelegyedik a verekedésbe, majd polgárok jönnek botokkal

POLGÁROK
Fustélyt, botot, kést! Verd csak, üsd agyon!
Fúj, Capuletek! Fúj-fúj, Montague-k!

Capulet hálóköntösben jön Capuletnével

CAPULET
Mi lárma ez? Hé, adssza hosszú kardom!

CAPULETNÉ
Mankót, mankót! - minek neked a kard?

CAPULET
A kardomat! - Vén Montague is itt van,
Hogy rázza rám ingerkedő vasát.

Montague, Montague-né jön

MONTAGUE
Gaz Capulet - hagyj engem, hagyj, ha mondom.

MONTAGUE-NÉ
Lépést se tőlem, nem fogsz vívni véle.

Herceg jön, kíséretével

HERCEG
Ti békebontó, zendülő cselédek,
Szomszédi vértől mocskosult vasakkal:
Nem hallotok? Mit! emberek, ti barmok!
Hát lángotok az eretekbe zajgó
Bíborpatakkal oltanátok el?
Halálfia, ki vérszínű kezéből
Le nem veti ádázkodó vasát
És most se hallgat feldühödt urára. -
Csip-csup szavak miatt már harmadízben
Polgárviszály támadt, zavarva békénk,
Miattatok, Capulet s Montague,
Verona agg polgárai pedig
Lerúgva tisztes, úri köntösük
Vén fringiát ragadtak vén kezükbe
Rozsdás patvarkodástokat leverni:
Hát az, aki még egyszer lázad itten,
Az életével fog fizetni érte.
Mostan tehát mindenki hazatér:
Te, Capulet, azonnal énvelem jössz,
S te, Montague, ma délután keress föl
A városházi székülőtanácsban,
Ottan tudod meg, mit határozunk majd.
Még egyszer: aki nem megy most se - meghal!

MONTAGUE
Mondd, ki kavarta föl e régi harcot?
Öcsém, te itt voltál a kezdeténél?

BENVOLIO
Ellenfeled cselédjei s tiéid,
Mikor kiléptem, már egymásra mentek.
Én hát közéjük álltam: erre jött
A vad Tybalt, kezében puszta karddal,
Szitkot lehelt fülembe, vívni hívott,
Vagdalta kardjával a levegőt,
Mely csak fütyült reá, sértetlenül.
Aztán döfödjük egymást és püföljük,
Sokan kifutnak, minden penge serceg,
Míg végre jön és szétválaszt a Herceg.

MONTAGUE-NÉ
Hol Romeo? - mondd, nem láttad te még ma?
Jó, hogy nem volt e csúf csetepatéba.

BENVOLIO
Egy órával korábban, hogy a szent nap
Keletnek aranyablakán kikukkant,
Bolyongni űzött nyugtalan kedélyem,
A szikamor-liget körül, amely
Nyugat felől övedzi városunkat,
Láttam fiad, ő már korán elindult.
Hozzá siettem, ám hogy észrevett,
A fák alá lopódzott hirtelen.
Én - mert tudom magamról, hogy az érzés
Mélyebb, mikor egész magunk vagyunk -
Érzésemet követtem és nem őt,
S kerültem őt, ki engem elkerült.

MONTAGUE
Hajnal felé már látták gyakran erre,
Locsolta a friss harmatot könnyével,
Felhőt dagasztott sóhaj-fellegekkel.
De amikor a mindent-kedvelő nap
Távol-Keleten, Aurora[1] ágyán
Széthúzza a borongó kárpitot,
Szalad a fény elől borús fiam,
Bezárja a szobája ablakát,
Kicsukja onnan a napot, verőfényt
És mesterséges éjszakát csinál:
Bús gondja egyre nő, akár az éjjel,
Ha jó tanács nem űzi végre széjjel.

BENVOLIO
És nem tudod, bátyám, mi az oka?

MONTAGUE
Ha sejteném! De erről nem beszél.

BENVOLIO
Mért nem fogod hát vallatóra egyszer?

MONTAGUE
Faggattam én is, sok barátja is:
De csak a szíve a tanácsadója.
És erre hallgat - nem tudom, miként -,
Elfordul ő a fürkész, vizsga szemtől,
Akár a bimbó, mit rág csúnya féreg
S nem tárja ki a szirmait a légnek,
És nem ajánlja szép arcát a napnak.
Mihelyt tudjuk, miért hullt e bú rája,
Megleljük azt is, hogy mi a kúrája.

BENVOLIO
Nézd, erre jő: siessetek tovább.
Törik-szakad, én meglelem okát.

MONTAGUE
Ha gyónna néked - bár lehetne hinnem -,
De boldog volnék. Asszonyom, jer innen.

Montague és Montague-né el. Romeo jön

BENVOLIO
Öcsém, jó reggelt!

ROMEO
Ily ifjú a nap?

BENVOLIO
Most múlt kilenc.

ROMEO
Időnk a bú alatt
Hosszúra nyúlik. Az apám szaladt el?

BENVOLIO
Az. - Mért hosszú a napja Romeónak?

ROMEO
Mert nincsen, ami megkurtítsa, testvér.

BENVOLIO
Szeretsz valakit?

ROMEO
Vége!

BENVOLIO
Nem szeretsz hát?

ROMEO
Az nem szeret, akit én szeretek.

BENVOLIO
Jaj, a Szerelem szemre oly szelíd,
S goromba zsarnok, hogyha közelít.

ROMEO
Jaj, ő magának mindig elegendő,
Szem nélkül is lát, bár szemén a kendő! -
Mondd, hol eszünk? Ó, jaj. - Mi volt a patvar?
Ne is beszélj, mindent hallottam itt.
Sok-sok gyűlölség s tenger szerelem: -
Veszett szerelem! Szerelmes gyűlölség!
Ó, valami, mi semmiből fogant!
Ó, súlyos könnyűség, komoly üresség,
Gyönyörű alakok torz zűrzavarja!
Ólompehely, hidegtűz, éberálom,
Beteg egészség, minden, ami nem!
Így szeretek én, s ezt nem szeretem.
Nem is nevetsz?

BENVOLIO
Inkább sírok, barátom.

ROMEO
Min sírsz, te jó szív?

BENVOLIO
Jó szíved baján.

ROMEO
Aki szeret, mind ily bolond, na lám.
A mellemet a bánat súlya nyomta,
Te tőlem elvetted, de erre nyomba
Több lett enyém: szóval mivel szerettél,
Nőtt bánatom s új béklyóba verettél.
Szeretni: sóhaj füstje, kósza gőz,
Majd szikratűz a szembe, hogyha győz,
S ha fáj, könnyekből egy nagy óceán.
Mi más szeretni? Higgadt, tiszta téboly -
Édes vigaszság, epe, ami szétfoly. -
Áldjon az ég.

BENVOLIO
Várj! Én megyek veled.
Megbántsz nagyon, ha meg nem engeded.

ROMEO
Csitt, elvesztettem önmagam, ne szóljál.
Romeo nincs itt: máshol valahol jár.

BENVOLIO
Mondd meg nekem, komolyan, kit szeretsz?

ROMEO
Hát nyögjek is, beszéljek is?

BENVOLIO
Ne nyögj,
Csak mondd meg komolyan.

ROMEO
Végrendelkezni kell szegény betegnek -
Beszélni kell annak, akit temetnek?
Hát komolyan, én egy - nőt szeretek.

BENVOLIO
Egy nőt? Hisz ezt sejtettem én előbb is.

ROMEO
Micsoda ész vagy. S a hegyébe: szép.

BENVOLIO
Így célt el nem hibáznék semmiképp.

ROMEO
De elhibáznád: mert neki hiába
Cupido[2] nyila, szűz, akár Diána.[3]
A tisztesség a vértje, és ha víjja,
Rajt széttör a szerelem csitri íja.
Szerelmes csók kis ostromát kacagja,
Szemek tüzét, s nem nyitja ki ölét
A szent nőt is megszédítő arany.
Szépsége gazdag - árva diadal -
Mert hogyha hal, szépsége véle hal.

BENVOLIO
Megesküdött, hogy szűz marad, azér?

ROMEO
Igen kucorgó, így tehát pazér.
A szépség, mit koplaltat a szigor,
Sok szép reményt, utódot eltipor.
Szép és nagyon jó, állja a delejt,
Ő égbe jut s engem pokolba ejt.
Szeretni nem akar e szűzi lélek
S az esküje halálom: holtan élek.

BENVOLIO
Akkor felejts el emlékezni rá.

ROMEO
De hogy felejtsek emlékezni, kérlek?

BENVOLIO
Úgy, hogy tekints a többi nő felé,
Hisz annyi szép van még.

ROMEO
De akkor én
Még szebbnek érzem őt, tökéletesbnek.
Fekete álca hölgyek homlokán
Arról beszél, milyen fehérek ők.
Ki megvakul, az nem feledheti
Szemevilága régi, drága kincsét.
Egy nőt mutass, kinél nincs szebb a földön,
S arcáról én azt olvasom ki majd,
Hogy nála is különb, százszorta szebb.
Eh, nem tanítsz feledni engemet.

BENVOLIO
De megtanítlak majd, nem engedek.

Elmennek


2. SZÍN

Utca.
Capulet, Páris, szolga jönnek

CAPULET
De Montague épp annyi büntetést kap,
Akárcsak én, nem lesz talán nehéz
Ily két aggcsontnak békében megélni.

PÁRIS
Mindkettőtöket megbecsül a Város.
Kár, hogy sokáig torzsalkodtatok.
De most, uram, mit szólasz az ügyemhez?

CAPULET
Csak azt, amit már mondottam tenéked,
Lányom alig forog a társaságban,
Tizennégy év se múlt fölötte el,
Előbb fonnyadjon el két nyár virága,
Akkor megérik nászra majd a drága.

PÁRIS
Volt már anya sok lány az ő korában.

CAPULET
Korai virág elhervad korábban.
Minden reményem a föld nyelte el,
Csak ez a lányka a földem reménye:
De udvarold és kérd meg, drága Páris,
Ha ő akar, akarom véle máris,
Ő válasszon ki téged szabadon,
S neked szavam, áldásomat adom.
Ma este nálam épp afféle bál van,
Sok-sok barátomat meginvitáltam,
Jöjj el közénk, a házigazda hadd
Örüljön, hogy a háza gazdagabb.
A földi csillagok az égi pompa
Tüzét túlfénylik majd szegény lakomba.
Üdülj tehát, mint ifjú - amikor
A sánta Tél sarkára rátipor
A piperés Tavasz - megannyi ringó
Szép lány között, aki akár a bimbó.
Nézd mindjüket, figyeld, ne légy te rest,
S ki legkülönb köztük, csak azt szeresd.
Ott lesz a lányom is, még kisleány,
A sok között csak egy picinyke szám.
No jöjj velem. (A szolgának írást ad)
Fickó, siess nagyon.
Találd meg őket, kiknek itt vagyon
Nevük fölírva, mind házamba várom,
Mondd, jöjjenek el hozzám mindenáron.

Capulet, Páris el

SZOLGA
Írva vagyon. De az is írva vagyon, hogy: varga maradjon a rőfjénél, szabó a kaptafájánál, halász az ecsetjénél, képíró a varsájánál. Engem pedig elküldenek, hogy találjam meg azokat, akiknek neve itt írva vagyon, de mégse találom meg benne azokat, akiket meg kellene találnom. Valami írástudó, deákos embert kell keresni: - no éppen itt jön.

Benvolio és Romeo jön

BENVOLIO
Eh, csak tűz oltja a tüzek parázsát,
A kínok írja egy új fájdalom.
És jaj gyógyítja gyötrelmek marását.
Szédülsz? kerengj a másik oldalon.
Fertőzd be szemedet egy új ragállyal,
S e régi méreg eltűnik ezáltal.

ROMEO
Az útilapu is ajánlatos.

BENVOLIO
Mire, barátom?

ROMEO
A tört lábra, pajtás.

BENVOLIO
Mit, megbolondultál te, Romeo?

ROMEO
Nem én, de megkötöztek, mint bolondot.
Tömlöcbe dobtak, koplaltatnak, ütnek,
Folyton gyötörnek s - jó estét, barátom.

SZOLGA
Jó estét. Tud-e olvasni az úr?

ROMEO
Tudok: az átkomat a nyomoromból.

SZOLGA
Azt nyilván könyv nélkül is tetszik már tudni: de én azt kérdezem, tud-e olvasni az úr olyasmit is, amit lát?

ROMEO
Ha ismerem a nyelvet és betűket.

SZOLGA
Jól adja. Isten tartsa meg a jókedvét.

ROMEO
Várj, fiú, tudok olvasni.
Elveszi az írást és olvassa
Signor Martino feleségével és leányaival;
Anselmo gróf, szépséges húgaival;
Özvegy Vitruvióné úrasszony;
Signor Placentio, kedves unokahúgaival;
Mercutio és öccse Bálint;
Tulajdon nagybátyám, Capulet, feleségével és leányaival;
Szép unokahúgom Róza s Livia;
Signor Valentino s unokaöccse, Tybalt;
Lucio és a vidor Ilona.
Visszaadja az írást
Szép társaság: és hova menjenek?

SZOLGA
Föl.

ROMEO
Hova?

SZOLGA
Vacsorára, a mi házunkba.

ROMEO
Kinek a házába?

SZOLGA
A gazdáméba.

ROMEO
Lásd, ezt előbb kellett volna kérdeznem.

SZOLGA
Elmondom én néked, ha nem is kérdezel: az én gazdám az a híres-nevezetes, dúsgazdag Capulet, s ha kigyelmetek nem a Montague házból valók, kérem, jöjjenek el szintén, hajtsanak föl nálunk egy kupa bort. No, Isten tartsa. (El)

BENVOLIO
Capuletéknek ősi ünnepén
Szép Róza is ott lesz, akit szeretsz,
S megannyi tündérlányka Veronából.
Jöjj fel, bíráló szemmel mérd az arcát
Az ő arcukhoz, s gondod elzavarjuk,
A hattyúban meglátod majd a varjut.

ROMEO
Ha a hívő szemem vallása csalfa,
Legyen a könnyem tűz, mert mást szerethet
S ha nem fulladt meg eddig, vízbe halva,
Hát tűzben égjen el, mint az eretnek,
Őnála nincsen szebb, a napvilágnál
Nem járt különb, mióta a világ áll.

BENVOLIO
Igen, mivel csak őt láttad szünetlen,
A képe lengett mind a két szemedben.
De hogyha e kristálymérlegre tennéd:
Az egyik serpenyőbe a szerelmét,
S másikba a sok lányt, már nem adózna
Úgy néki szíved, s könnyű volna Róza.

ROMEO
No elmegyek, de nem ront meg az álom,
Csak őt imádom, ott is őt csodálom.

Elmennek


3. SZÍN

Szoba Capuleték házában.
Capuletné és Dajka bejön

CAPULETNÉ
Hol a leányom, dajka? Hívd be őt.

DAJKA
Már hívtam, oly igaz, amint igaz, hogy
Szűz voltam tizenkét éves koromban.
Hé, báránykám! Madárkám! Ejnye, hol van?
Hé, Júlia!

Júlia jön

JÚLIA
Ki hív?

DAJKA
Anyád.

JÚLIA
Anyám?
Nos, itt vagyok, mi tetszik?

CAPULETNÉ
Hát azt akarnám - dajka, hagyj magunkra,
Négyszemközött; de nem, jöjj vissza, dajka.
Inkább te is halld, mit beszélgetünk -
Tudod, hogy a kislányom már nagyocska -

DAJKA
Órára is megmondhatom korát.

CAPULETNÉ
Még nincs tizennégy.

DAJKA
Tizennégy fogamra -
Miből alig lehet ma (azt hiszem) négy -,
Még nincs tizennégy. Mondjátok, mikor lesz
Mostan vasas Szent Péter napja?

CAPULETNÉ
Két hét
És pár nap múlva.

DAJKA
Mindegy, bármikor,
Azon az éjszakán lesz épp tizennégy.
Zsuzsim meg ő - Isten nyugtassa őt -
Egyívású. Zsuzsim elvette Isten,
Nem érdemeltem: - szó mi szó, aszondom -
Vasas Szent Péter éjén lesz tizennégy,
Akkor bizony, emlékezem reá.
A földrengésnek már tizenegy éve
S én éppen aznap választottam el,
Mivel hogy ürmöt kentem a csöcsömre,
Künn a galambdúcnál sütött a nap -
Az úrral akkor Mantovába jártak -
Van még eszem csak - szó mi szó, aszondom -
Mikor a mellem bimbaján az ürmöt
Lenyalta ez a kis csacsi, s fanyar volt,
Dühösködött, így rázta a csöcsöm.
Most reccs galambdúc, ész nélkül futottam,
Zargatni sem kellett nagyon.
Hát ennek épp tizenegy éve van.
Már állni is tudott, a szent keresztre,
Futkározott, boklászott erre-arra.
Előző nap beverte homlokát,
És az uram - nyugtassa őt az Isten -
Tréfás egy ember volt, fölkapta nyomban:
"No", mondta, "kislány, az arcodra estél?
Ha több eszed lesz, majd hanyatt esel te,
Ugye, Julis?" Aztán a kis komiszka
Máris csitult s azt mondta rá: "Aha."
No lám, a tréfaság valóra válik!
Ha ezer évig élek, sem felejtem:
"Ugye, Julis?" mondotta az uram,
S a kis komiszka rávágott: "Aha."

CAPULETNÉ
Elég legyen már, kérlek, végre hallgass.

DAJKA
No hallgatok. De hát muszáj nevetnem,
Hogy elcsitult, s azt mondta rá: "Aha",
Pedig biz' isten oly nagyocska púp volt
A homlokán, mint egy kokas monya,
Rútul beverte, rítt keservesen.
"No", mondta az uram, "arcodra estél?
Ha több eszed lesz, majd hanyatt esel te,
Ugye, Julis?" S csitulva szólt: "Aha."

CAPULETNÉ
Csitulj te is, ha mondom, csitt, dadus, csitt.

DAJKA
Csitt, szót se hát. Isten tartson sokáig.
Sosem szoptattam ily remek babuskát.
Csak azt kívánnám még megérni, hogy majd
Férjhez mehess.

CAPULETNÉ
Férjhezmenésről: én is éppen erről
Szólnék veled. - Mondd, Júlia, leányom,
Hajlandó volnál férjhezmenni te?

JÚLIA
Nincs a világon ennél szebb dolog.

DAJKA
Nincs szebb dolog! Ha nem volnék dadád,
Azt hinném, tejjel szoptál bölcsességet.

CAPULETNÉ
Gondolj reá hát, ifjabb nők tenálad,
Itt Veronában - s mind előkelőek -
Most már anyák: ha visszagondolok,
A te korodban én is anya voltam.
Te meg leány. Száz szónak egy a vége:
A délceg Páris kéri a kezed.

DAJKA
Az ám a férfi, kislány, párja sincsen,
Széles világon - férfi az, viaszkból.

CAPULETNÉ
Ilyen virág nincs Verona nyarában.

DAJKA
Virág: jól tetszik mondani: virág!

CAPULETNÉ
Mit szólsz? Szeretnéd ezt a nemesúrfit?
Ma este a bálunkra eljön ő is,
Olvasd az ifjú Páris kedves arcát,
E könyvet, mit a Szépség tolla írt,
Figyeld a sorok kedves vonalát,
Egyik a másnak csak tartalmat ád.
S ami a könyvben tán rémlik kavargón,
Azt a szemében megleled: a margón.
Szép, drága könyv, kötetlen és szerelmes,
Csak egy kötés kell és tökéletes lesz.
Aztán, amint tengerben él a hal,
Csinos külső gazdag belsőre vall.
Hiszen a könyv is úgy kívánatos,
Mikor arany-szót zár arany-kapocs.
Zárd el magadba ajándékodat,
S nem lesz ezáltal kisebb, vékonyabb.

DAJKA
Sőt vastagabb a jó férjtől a nő.

CAPULETNÉ
Egy-kettő, mondd, tudnád szeretni Párist?

JÚLIA
Szeretném látni, hogy szeressem-e,
De nem lövellem a tekintetem
Mélyebbre, csak mint meghagytad nekem.

Szolga jön

SZOLGA
Jaj, nagyasszony, a vendégek meggyöttek, a vacsorát föltálalták, a kisasszonyt keresik, a kamrában szidják a dajkát, mint a bokrot, minden tótágast áll. Én futok fölszolgálni, kérem, jöjjenek tüstént.

CAPULETNÉ
Tüstént.
Szolga el
Leányom, a gróffal beszéljél.

DAJKA
Menj, fruska, a szép napra jő a szép éj.

Elmennek


4. SZÍN

Utca. Romeo, Mercutio, Benvolio,
öt-hat álarcos, fáklyavivők és mások jönnek

ROMEO
De mentségünkre szólsz azért néhány szót?
Vagy ajtóstul rontunk be hirtelen?

BENVOLIO
Efféle móka nem divat manapság:
Ámor se kell itt, bekötött szemekkel,
Aki tatáros, pingált lécnyilával
Madárijesztőként riasztja nőink,
Se bemagolt mondóka, mit dadogva
Nyögünk súgó után, mikor belépünk:
Csak tartsanak annak, minek akarnak,
A táncolókkal tartunk és sipirc.

ROMEO
Fáklyát nekem. Én nem tudok bokázni.
Sötét vagyok, inkább világitok.

MERCUTIO
Nem, Romeóm, táncolni kell neked.

ROMEO
Tirajtatok a könnyű tánccipellő,
Akár az álom, ám a lelkem ólom,
A földre húz le, nem birok mozogni.

MERCUTIO
Szerelmes vagy: vedd Ámor röpke szárnyát
S elszállsz a földről, hogyha felkötöd.

ROMEO
Ezt kötve hinném: úgy belém kötött,
Úgy megbökött nyilával: lenge tollán
Nem szállhatom túl lomha bánatom,
A szerelemnek terhe földre roskaszt.

MERCUTIO
Roskadj te rá, terheld meg te a terhét,
Gyöngécske lény az, enged egy nyomásnak.

ROMEO
A szerelem gyöngécske? Aj de durva,
Vad, hepciás, és szúr, mint a tövis.

MERCUTIO
Ha durva véled, légy te véle durvább,
Szúrd, hogyha szúr, és így alád kerül majd.
Adj hát hamar arcomra egy tokot:
Álarcot ölt
Maszkot a maszkra! - Bánom is, kutassa
A kandi szem e rút arcátlan arcot,
A képtelen kép majd pirul helyettem.

BENVOLIO
Gyertek, kopogjunk és mihelyt beléptünk,
Ki-ki forgassa emberül a lábát.

ROMEO
Fáklyát nekem; a léha széltoló
Csiklandja sarkkal a holt, asszu deszkát.
Én azt tartom, mit az öregapáink:
"Csak nézek és majd gyertyát tartok inkább."
Nagyon unom e gyönyörű világot.

MERCUTIO
Világtalan, ki unja a világot,
Vak vagy, a szerelem gödrébe hulltál,
Fülig ganéjba - tisztesség ne essék -,
Én majd kihúzlak. Hagyd azt a világot.

ROMEO
Melyik világot?

MERCUTIO
Nos, úgy állasz avval,
Lobogsz, sziporkázol, mint lámpa nappal.
Hallgass reám - ha gyönge is a szóvicc -
Amit tanácslok néked, mégse kófic.

ROMEO
De az se lenne éppen jó dolog,
Ha most bemennénk.

MERCUTIO
Hát mért gondolod?

ROMEO
Mert éjszaka erről álmodtam.

MERCUTIO
Én is.

ROMEO
Mit?

MERCUTIO
Azt, hogy aki álmodik, csaló.

ROMEO
Csak öncsaló, mert álma, az való.

MERCUTIO
No nézd, a Mab királyné járt tenálad,
A tündérek bábája, oly parányi
Alakban jön, mint városi szenátor
Mutatóujján a gyűrűs agátkő.
Aprócska, kis könnyű fogatba hajt át
Az emberek orrán, mikor alusznak.
A kerekek küllője nyurga pókláb,
A hintó födele egy szöcskeszárny,
A hámja finom pókháló-fonál,
Gyeplője a hold lucskos sugara.
Ostornyele tücsökcomb, rost a szíja.
Csöpp, szürkementés szúnyog a kocsis,
Félakkora, mint a kövér kukac,
Mit rest cseléd a ujjából vakar ki.
A kocsiváz egy üres mogyoró,
A mókus eszkábálta, vagy a vén szú,
Kik ősidőktől tündér-kocsigyártók.
Így robban át a szeretők agyán
Éjente, és az álmuk szerelem,
Udvarló térdén, s udvarlás az álma,
Fiskális ujján, és az álma pördíj,
Nők ajkain, s álmukban csókolódznak.
De Mab ha mérges, szájuk hólyagos lesz,
Mivel a habcsók nékik is megárt.
Nem egyszer udvaronc orrába vágtat,
S az erre már kitüntetést szagol,
Máskor dézsmás malacka farkhegyével
Csiklandja az alvó papocska orrát
És az plébániáról álmodik.
Majd átrobog a katona agyán
És álma sok-sok nyakszelés, spanyoltőr,
Les és roham, aztán öt ölnyi mély,
Jó-nagy ivászat; hirtelen a dobszó
Pörög fülében, fölriad, ocsúdik,
Kicsit szedi a szenteket az égből
S megint elalszik. Ő, a Mab királyné,
Lovak sörényét éjjel egybefonja,
Csombókos hajba süt varázsgubancot
S hogy szertebontod, az babonaság.
Boszorka ő, a lányt, ha háton alszik,
Megnyomja, terhet bírni így tanítja,
Hogy jól feküdjön majd asszony-korában.
Ő az, ki...

ROMEO
Hallgass, Mercutio, hallgass.
Semmit beszélsz.

MERCUTIO
Hisz álomról beszélek,
Amit csupán a henye agyvelő szült
És semmiből a képzelet koholt.
Matériája vékony, mint a lég
És csapodárabb, mint a szél, mi mostan
Észak fagyott keblén kacérkodik,
De nyomba megharagszik, délre rebben
S csorgó harmatba fürdeti az arcát.

BENVOLIO
E szél, miről szólsz, elfújt minket is.
Megvacsoráztak már, későn jövünk.

ROMEO
Sőt tán korán: egyszerre sejti lelkem,
Hogy a Sors, mely a csillagokban csüng még,
Ez éji bálon kezdi meg komor,
Szörnyű futását, és unt életem,
Mit a mellembe zárok itt, gonosz
Csellel korahalálba kergeti.
De Ő, ki kormányozza a hajómat,
Vigye vitorlám - víg urak, előre.

BENVOLIO
Dobszót reá.

Mind el


5. SZÍN

Csarnok Capulet házában. Zenészek várakoznak, szolgák jönnek

ELSŐ SZOLGA
Hol az a Lábas Anti? Tányérokat kéne váltani. De az nem váltja, inkább nyalja.

MÁSODIK SZOLGA
Csak egy-két étekfogó mosogat, az is ilyen mosdatlan. Piszokság.

ELSŐ SZOLGA
Arrébb a székekkel, odébb a pohárszékkel, vigyázz az ezüsttálra. Pajtás, tégy majd félre nekem egy kis marcipánt, ha szeretsz, és súgd meg a portásnak, hogy engedje be a Köszörüs Zsuzsit meg a Nellit.

MÁSODIK SZOLGA
Mit akarsz, cimbora?

ELSŐ SZOLGA
Odabenn a nagy szálában mindnyájan titeket keresnek, hívnak, kajtatnak, hajkurásznak.

MÁSODIK SZOLGA
Hát nem lehetünk itt is meg ott is. Kitartás, gyerekek, csak egy kis kitartás, végül úgyis nekünk marad a java.

Visszavonulnak.
Capulet, Júlia, családtagok, vendégek, álarcosok jönnek

CAPULET
Isten hozott, urak! A nők, akiknek
Lábán nincs tyúkszem, mind táncolni vágynak.
Á, hölgyeim! Ki kosarazza ki
A táncosát? Az illetőt bizonnyal
Gonosz tyúkszem kínozza, eltaláltam?
Isten hozott, urak! Hej, hajdan én is
Álarcba voltam s pajzán, drága szókat
Tudtam susogni a szépasszonyok
Fülébe. - Ennek vége, vége, vége.
Á, uraim! Húzzátok rá, zenészek.
Helyet, helyet. Forogjatok, leánykák.
Zene, tánc
Több fényt, te fickó, félre azt az asztalt,
Oltsd a tüzet ki, mert cudar meleg van.
Ugye remek - fiú - e házibál?
Csak ülj le, Capulet bátyám, csak ülj le.
Mi eltáncoltuk már a táncainkat.
Mikor esett utolszor, hogy mi ketten
Álarcba voltunk?

ÖREG CAPULET
Harminc éve annak.

CAPULET
Ne mondd, öreg. Nincs annyi, nincsen annyi.
Lucentio pünkösdkor esküdött
S bár gyors a pünkösd, csak huszonöt éve
Lesz ennek és akkor álarcba voltunk.

ÖREG CAPULET
Több éve annak. A nagyobb fia
A harmincat tapossa.

CAPULET
Mit beszélsz te?
Két év előtt még nagykorú se volt.

ROMEO
Ki az a hölgy, ki ottan amaz úrnak
Ékíti karját?

SZOLGA
Nem tudom, uram.

ROMEO
A fáklya tőle izzóbb lángra lobban!
Szépsége úgy csüng az éj arculatján,
Mint fényes ékszer szerecsen fülén!
Túl szép e földre, nem való ide!
Ki hófehér galamb, ahhoz hasonló,
S aki körötte van, fekete holló.
A tánc után majd meglesem, hol ül
S érdes kezem kezétől üdvezül.
Szerettem eddig? Nem, tagadd le, szem.
Csak most látok szépet, ma éjjelen.

TYBALT
Hangjából ez csak Montague lehet: -
Add tőrömet, fiú: - a semmiházi
Álarc alatt merészkedik közénk,
Csúfolni, meggyalázni ünnepünket?
Az őseimnek százszor szent nevére,
Bűnnek se tartom, hogy kifoly a vére.

CAPULET
Ugyan, mi lelt, öcsém, miért viharzol?

TYBALT
Bátyám, ez ellenségünk, Montague.
Álarcba jött, gúnyból, a semmiházi,
Hogy meggyalázza éji ünnepünket.

CAPULET
Ifjú Romeo?

TYBALT
A gaz Romeo.

CAPULET
No csöndesedj, te kedves öcs, ne bántsd őt,
Hisz úgy viselkedik, mint nemesúrfi,
S őszintén szólva Verona dicséri,
Milyen derék és jólnevelt fiú.
A város minden kincséért se hagynám,
Hogy itt az én házamban sértegessék.
Csitulj le és ügyet se vess reá.
Parancsolom; tehát szépen fogadj szót,
Nézz nyájasan, a homlokod se morcold,
Efféle bál az más modort kiván.

TYBALT
És más vendéget, mint ez a zsivány.
Én nem birom.

CAPULET
De el kell bírnod őt:
Tessék, fiam? - Mondom, bírnod kell őt - menj.
Te vagy a házigazda itt, vagy én? Menj.
Hogy nem bírod el őt, te? Isten őrizz!
Vendégeim fölkoncolod talán?
Kakaskodol! Ki a legény a gáton!

TYBALT
De ez gyalázat, bátya -

CAPULET
Menj, ha mondom.
Orcátlan kölyke - az vagy, az, fiacskám!
Még ráfizetsz tréfádra - jól vigyázzál:
Megjárhatod nagyon, csak kezdj ki vélem.
Úgy, szíveim, igen. - Te zöld kamasz, menj:
Csitulj, különben - több fényt erre! - Szégyen!
Majd elcsitítlak! - Vígan, szíveim!

TYBALT
Izzó dühöm békítitek szelíden
S most béke és düh rázza minden ízem.
Megyek: de az a béke, mely ma édes,
Majd nemsokára keserű-epés lesz. (Elmegy)

ROMEO
Szentségtelen kézzel fogom ez áldott,
Szentséges oltárt, ezt a lágy kacsót,
De ajkam - e két piruló zarándok -
Jóváteszi s bűnöm föloldja csók.

JÚLIA
Zarándok, a kezed mivégre bántod?
Hisz jámbor áhítat volt az egész.
A szent kezét is illeti zarándok
És csókolódzik akkor kézbe kéz.

ROMEO
Szentnek s zarándoknak hát nincs-e ajka?

JÚLIA
Van, ámde csak imádkoznak vele.

ROMEO
Ó, szent, kezed ajkad kövesse, rajta,
Halld meg imám, ne lökj pokolba le.

JÚLIA
A szent csak áll, bár hallja az imát.

ROMEO
Állj s a jutalmat én veszem im át.
Ajkadtól ajkam így lesz bűntelen.

Megcsókolja

JÚLIA
De ezzel az én ajkam bűnösebb lesz.

ROMEO
Bűnös? Te unszolsz bűnre szüntelen.
Add vissza bűnöm.

Megint megcsókolja

JÚLIA
Jaj, de értesz ehhez.

DAJKA
Egy szóra kéret az anyád, kisasszony.

ROMEO
Ki az ő anyja?

DAJKA
Ej, fiatalúr,
A háziasszony az ő édesanyja:
Én dajkáltam lányát, kivel beszéltél,
És mondhatom, hogy jól imádkozott az,
Aki megkapja egykor.

ROMEO
Capulet?
Szívem az ellenség prédája lett.

BENVOLIO
Gyerünk, a játék elvadul, elég.

ROMEO
Ó, jaj nekem: az életem a tét.

CAPULET
Hová szaladtok ily hamar, urak?
Fölhajthatunk még egynéhány pohár bort.
Hát mentek? Akkor köszönöm tinektek,
Kedves barátaim, jó éjszakát!
Fáklyákat erre. Nos, gyerünk az ágyba.
Az öreg Capulethez
Bizony, öreg, most már öregidő van,
Menjünk aludni.

Mind el, csak Júlia és Dajka nem

JÚLIA
Jöjj csak, dadus. Ki ottan az az úr?

DAJKA
A vén Tiberio első fia.

JÚLIA
És az, aki most az ajtó felé megy?

DAJKA
Na várj, az az ifjú Petrucchio.

JÚLIA
S ki nem táncolt ma este, ott mögötte?

DAJKA
Nem ösmerem.

JÚLIA
Menj nyomba, kérdezd meg nevét: - ha nős,
Akkor a sírom lesz a nászi ágyam.

DAJKA
A neve Romeo, egy Montague,
Nagy ellenségtek egyetlen fia.

JÚLIA
Ó, gyűlölet, te anyja szerelemnek.
Korán láttam meg s későn ösmerem meg.
Milyen csodás, csodás a szerelem:
Halálos ellenségem szeretem.

DAJKA
Mi az, mi az?

JÚLIA
Egy vers, a táncosomtól
Tanultam az imént.

DAJKA
No jösszte, kincsem,
Elment a vendég, most már senki sincsen.

Elmennek

KAR
(belép) A régi láz most meghalt, üt az óra,
Új szerelemnek kell kigyúlnia.
A szép lány, kit imádott Romeója,
Nem szép neki, csak egy szép: Júlia.
Immár szeretik egymást mind a ketten,
Rokon-szemükbe lobbadoz a láng.
De a fiú a harctól visszaretten,
És szörnyű gát ijesztgeti a lányt.
Romeo, mint ellenség, szólni sem mer.
Nem vall neki, csak egyre bujdokol.
Júlia vívódik vad szerelemmel,
Ő sem találja édesét sehol.
De majd erőt, időt lelnek hamar
S megédesül az, ami most fanyar.

Függöny



KiadóEurópa
Az idézet forrásaWilliam Shakespeare: Romeo és Júlia

minimap